Basis Wristwatch Measures Your Body Signals - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Government // Mobile & Wireless
News
1/11/2012
10:19 AM
Connect Directly
Facebook
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Basis Wristwatch Measures Your Body Signals

Capturing motion, skin temperature, heart rate, and more, the Basis watch can help you measure and understand a variety of health factors.

12 Mobile Health Apps Worth A Closer Look
9 Mobile Health Apps Worth A Closer Look
(click image for larger view and for slideshow)
Your body is a walking, exercising, sleeping, sweating trove of information. The trouble is, you're not paying much attention (well, maybe the sweating part), mostly because that information is difficult to capture. Technology to the rescue again. Basis has a wristwatch that measures a variety of health factors, captures the information, and then processes and interprets the information. It's one of the more comprehensive systems I've seen in this form factor.

For example, many products take a measure of heart rate. Some help count the steps a user takes during the course of a day. Others track calories. Basis Health And Heart measures heart rate, motion (using accelerometers), galvanic skin response, and skin and ambient temperature.

All of this data gets synced up to Basis (its "cloud service"), where the user can browse the information. Some of the data (motion and skin temperature, for example) gets interpreted as sleep; other data (motion and sweating, for instance) gets interpreted as exercise (although one might argue that this could constitute bad sleep, but let's not get personal). The upshot, then, is that this data isn't just interpreted individually, but taken and understood collectively.

[ There are a growing number of options for monitoring your health. Read iPhone Pulse Oximeter: New App For That. ]

The watch (and yes, it does tell time) uses a host of sensors to detect all of this, and it even includes an optical sensor that emits light into the skin at a particular frequency in order to determine heart rate.

There are some similarities to the much ballyhoo'd Jawbone Up, which was riddled with hardware problems when it shipped. The idea is still a good one. The biggest problem I have with the Basis product is that the software side is completely browser based. That works, but having that data in a smartphone app would also be good, especially for viewing the data offline, as so many products let users do.

At $199, it's not a bad deal. The Jawbone Up is $99, just for comparison's sake.

As healthcare providers of all shapes and sizes start implementing electronic medical records systems, security must be a top priority. Here's what you need to be thinking about to ensure your system is locked down. Download the report here (registration required).

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
10 Ways to Transition Traditional IT Talent to Cloud Talent
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  11/23/2020
News
Top 10 Data and Analytics Trends for 2021
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  11/13/2020
Commentary
Can Low Code Measure Up to Tomorrow's Programming Demands?
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  11/16/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Why Chatbots Are So Popular Right Now
In this IT Trend Report, you will learn more about why chatbots are gaining traction within businesses, particularly while a pandemic is impacting the world.
Slideshows
Flash Poll