8 Technologies Changing Home Healthcare - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Healthcare // Patient Tools
News
12/18/2014
08:06 AM
Alison Diana
Alison Diana
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail

8 Technologies Changing Home Healthcare

Technologies such as sensors, GPS, and even senior-focused social networks can help seniors continue to live at home.
2 of 10

SensorsAdvanced remote patient monitoring sales accounted for $29.7 billion worldwide in 2014, according to Kalorama Information, and a good deal of that demand came from home treatment and health facilities. 'We have received significant interest from elder care providers who are seeking to keep the elderly in their homes rather than moving them to assisted-living centers,' Jason Johnson, chair of the Internet of Things Consortium, told Scientific American. 
Sensors can be placed around the home -- on doors and windows -- as well as in appliances and on the patient. They alert caregivers if the senior misses a meal, doesn't get out of bed, or falls. Some Alzheimer's patients, for example, remain at home under a program that monitors their movements via sensors and smartphone apps, and alerts their nearby caretakers to risky behavior -- such as leaving the house, forgetting to eat, or leaving water running too long.
One example of a worn sensor is the Lively safety watch, which looks like a smartwatch. 'A lot of people don't want to wear the garage door opener,' CEO Iggy Fanlo told InformationWeek. 'We had to make a beautiful product people aren't ashamed of wearing.'
The device, which detects falls as well as inactivity and other situations, connects to sensors and an around-the-clock call center. The waterproof device also has a one-push help button, switchable colored bands, medication reminders, daily activity sharing, step counting, and family alerts. 

(Source: Lively)

Sensors
Advanced remote patient monitoring sales accounted for $29.7 billion worldwide in 2014, according to Kalorama Information, and a good deal of that demand came from home treatment and health facilities. "We have received significant interest from elder care providers who are seeking to keep the elderly in their homes rather than moving them to assisted-living centers," Jason Johnson, chair of the Internet of Things Consortium, told Scientific American.

Sensors can be placed around the home -- on doors and windows -- as well as in appliances and on the patient. They alert caregivers if the senior misses a meal, doesn't get out of bed, or falls. Some Alzheimer's patients, for example, remain at home under a program that monitors their movements via sensors and smartphone apps, and alerts their nearby caretakers to risky behavior -- such as leaving the house, forgetting to eat, or leaving water running too long.

One example of a worn sensor is the Lively safety watch, which looks like a smartwatch. "A lot of people don't want to wear the garage door opener," CEO Iggy Fanlo told InformationWeek. "We had to make a beautiful product people aren't ashamed of wearing."

The device, which detects falls as well as inactivity and other situations, connects to sensors and an around-the-clock call center. The waterproof device also has a one-push help button, switchable colored bands, medication reminders, daily activity sharing, step counting, and family alerts.

(Source: Lively)

2 of 10
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
zzth1
50%
50%
zzth1,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/4/2015 | 8:52:51 AM
Sensors
I just want to comment about the fact that sensors have really helped the home care workers so much. I know a few home health care centers that do part time service for the patient. These are usually available if the patient is able bodied and can perform almost everything with little or no problem. The sensors or the little necklaces that can alert when there is a problem can really save those peoples' lives. When you get that old falling down is like falling off a building. You just aren't going to recover very well and you may not be able to get up like you could when you are younger. 

 
MarkL367
50%
50%
MarkL367,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/16/2015 | 3:19:30 PM
Technology and home care
It is amazing to see how technology is improving and advancing in every industry. I never would have considered installing censors around for home health care use. It is a fantastic idea though that could help care takers know if something has happened in the home.
asksqn
50%
50%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2014 | 3:39:22 PM
Needs more work but good ideas nonetheless
While there will always be exceptions regardless of how simplified tech becomes, these eight technologies detailed here will be a great help to caregivers (and remote family members) once the tech matures.
News
Think Like a Chief Innovation Officer and Get Work Done
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  10/13/2020
Slideshows
10 Trends Accelerating Edge Computing
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  10/8/2020
News
Northwestern Mutual CIO: Riding Out the Pandemic
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  10/7/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
[Special Report] Edge Computing: An IT Platform for the New Enterprise
Edge computing is poised to make a major splash within the next generation of corporate IT architectures. Here's what you need to know!
Slideshows
Flash Poll