Hackers Outsmart Pacemakers, Fitbits: Worried Yet? - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Healthcare // Security & Privacy
News
12/12/2013
08:36 AM
David F Carr
David F Carr
Slideshows
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail

Hackers Outsmart Pacemakers, Fitbits: Worried Yet?

Mobile health devices aren't as secure as you might think. Look at how researchers plan to strengthen security for consumer devices and regulated medical devices.
8 of 12

Amulet Of Protection
Personal health gadgets pose their own risks but also could be part of the solution. The Amulet Project, led by researchers from Dartmouth College and Clemson University, seeks to produce a piece of 'computational jewelry' that could act as a secure hub for an individual's body-based network. Prototypes have been created using devices such as the Motorola MOTOACTV wristband (seen here). The Amulet device would take responsibility for secure connections among health and medical devices and external services, minimizing the computational burden on individual devices.

Personal health gadgets pose their own risks but also could be part of the solution. The Amulet Project, led by researchers from Dartmouth College and Clemson University, seeks to produce a piece of "computational jewelry" that could act as a secure hub for an individual's body-based network. Prototypes have been created using devices such as the Motorola MOTOACTV wristband (seen here). The Amulet device would take responsibility for secure connections among health and medical devices and external services, minimizing the computational burden on individual devices.

8 of 12
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
MedicalQuack
50%
50%
MedicalQuack,
User Rank: Moderator
12/12/2013 | 2:47:38 PM
Privacy too
I'm a privacy advocate and that along with security are two big issues for me.  The data selling epidemic in the US is so bad as you have the likes of Walgreens making about a billion a year selling data and Fitbit's model is built around selling data profiles...have a campaign for the FTC to license and excise tax all data sellers so they can regulate it.  Can't do that until we have an index..that would be a license.

Oh wellness companies owned by insurance companies love to get a hold of data like this and it will end up in some analytics program to fix you in some fasion or another or potentially in time to deny access to something or someone.

http://ducknetweb.blogspot.com/2013/08/ftc-tries-to-bring-strong-case-for.html


I am all over the FTC all the time about this.  There's a new "open" device out there which would allow one to choose their platform to use with it and that in time may be a plus as it would be out there for everyone to jump and fix flaws, security or otherwise. 
Laurianne
100%
0%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
12/12/2013 | 1:05:40 PM
No thanks to that network
Human bodies with a network of implanted medical devices? No thank you. I prefer to remain my own network administrator.
David F. Carr
100%
0%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
12/12/2013 | 10:05:18 AM
Sooner or later ...
The cybersecurity researchers are trying to raise enough of an alarm to change things, without being alarmist. Yet I have to wonder how long it will be before a real hack of someone's pacemaker comes to light, or some other life critical incident occurs.

Or is this really too far-fetched? Granted, there are easier ways to kill someone.
RobPreston
50%
50%
RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
12/12/2013 | 9:52:24 AM
Oh my
I'm a tad more worried about hackers messing with pacemakers than with Fitbits. Nonetheless, this is beyond wrong.
Commentary
What Becomes of CFOs During Digital Transformation?
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  2/4/2020
News
Fighting the Coronavirus with Analytics and GIS
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  2/3/2020
Slideshows
IT Careers: 10 Job Skills in High Demand This Year
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  2/3/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
IT 2020: A Look Ahead
Are you ready for the critical changes that will occur in 2020? We've compiled editor insights from the best of our network (Dark Reading, Data Center Knowledge, InformationWeek, ITPro Today and Network Computing) to deliver to you a look at the trends, technologies, and threats that are emerging in the coming year. Download it today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll