Home Editions Of Windows Vista Won't Run On Mac Or Linux Virtual Machines - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Software // Enterprise Applications

Home Editions Of Windows Vista Won't Run On Mac Or Linux Virtual Machines

The end-user license agreements specifically forbid users from booting the software 'within a virtual (or otherwise emulated) hardware system,' Microsoft says.

Mac owners and Linux users hoping to run Windows Vista using virtual machine software had better own the Business or Ultimate editions of the new operating system, according to Microsoft's licensing terms.

The end-user license agreements governing both the Home Basic and Home Premium editions of the OS specifically forbid users from booting the software "within a virtual (or otherwise emulated) hardware system." The blanket prohibitions don't apply to the higher-end editions of Windows Vista.

That means Linux aficionados or users of Apple Macs will not legally be able to use software from vendors such as Parallels or EMC's VMWare to create so-called virtual machines on their desktops to run Vista alongside their favorite OS. Windows users wanting to run Vista in a virtual machine environment for security or productivity purposes also will need either the Business or Ultimate Edition.

In his blog, Parallels head of marketing Ben Rudolph says the licensing policy could cost Microsoft some new customers. "This strategy could hold back users who embrace cutting-edge technologies like virtualization, which means they won't upgrade to Vista. This means that Microsoft has effectively lost an upgrade customer [in the case of Windows PCs] or an entirely new customer [for Mac and Linux users]," Rudolph writes.

Even users who shell out for the more expensive Ultimate or Business editions of Vista aren't free to use the software in virtual environments any way they want. "If you do so, you may not play or access content or use applications protected by any Microsoft digital, information, or enterprise rights management technology or other Microsoft rights management services or use BitLocker," states the license agreement for Vista Ultimate and Vista Business.

BitLocker is a data encryption feature that's integrated into the Vista operating system.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
News
How to Create a Successful AI Program
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  10/14/2020
News
Think Like a Chief Innovation Officer and Get Work Done
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  10/13/2020
Slideshows
10 Trends Accelerating Edge Computing
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  10/8/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
[Special Report] Edge Computing: An IT Platform for the New Enterprise
Edge computing is poised to make a major splash within the next generation of corporate IT architectures. Here's what you need to know!
Slideshows
Flash Poll