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From Casinos to Counterterrorism

Washington Post reporter Ellen Nakashima describes in a Monday, October 22 article, "From Casinos to Counterterrorism," how Las Vegas is a cutting-edge adopter of surveillance technology that has also found its way into U.S. security efforts. Las Vegas has "embraced the twin trends of data mining and high-tech surveillance, with arguably more cameras per square foot than any airport or sports arena in the country."
Washington Post reporter Ellen Nakashima describes in a Monday, October 22 article, "From Casinos to Counterterrorism," how Las Vegas is a cutting-edge adopter of surveillance technology that has also found its way into U.S. security efforts. Las Vegas has "embraced the twin trends of data mining and high-tech surveillance, with arguably more cameras per square foot than any airport or sports arena in the country."

The casinos are applying facial-recognition, information-sharing, link-analysis, and sophisticated pattern-detection technologies to spot card counters, cheaters, and illegal collusion. Exhaustive tracking helps identify suspicious behavior and spot both high-rollers, who receive special treatment, and low- and middle-rollers, who are targeted for promotions. The casinos are even starting to use gaming chips with embedded RFID chips to track betting.Nakashima reports on Homeland Security uptake of some of the technologies advanced by Las Vegas's demand... and on concerns that, in the words of Barry Steinhardt, technology and liberty project director at the American Civil Liberties Union, "It isn't just video surveillance or face recognition or license plate readers or RFID chips. It's that all these technologies are converging to create a surveillance society."Washington Post reporter Ellen Nakashima describes in a Monday, October 22 article, "From Casinos to Counterterrorism," how Las Vegas is a cutting-edge adopter of surveillance technology that has also found its way into U.S. security efforts. Las Vegas has "embraced the twin trends of data mining and high-tech surveillance, with arguably more cameras per square foot than any airport or sports arena in the country."