Wearables At Work: 9 Security Steps Worth Taking - InformationWeek

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Data Management // IoT
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6/6/2016
07:06 AM
Lisa Morgan
Lisa Morgan
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Wearables At Work: 9 Security Steps Worth Taking

Wearables are finding their way into organizations, whether or not IT departments are prepared to deal with them. As the number of endpoints continues to grow, so does the potential for hacks. These nine pointers will help you prepare your organization to keep ahead of threats.
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Know The Law 
Data breaches are dealt with differently in different jurisdictions, which means laws vary from country to country and from state to state. Failing to understand the differences can increase liability exposure, which may take the form of fines in addition to lawsuit costs.
'Most businesses have no idea what the law is on this. Know the law. Read it at a minimum, look it up online, or even better, hire a lawyer to help you develop a system to respond to a data breach,' Goodnow said.
Also, consider a security audit from a credible third party. If your company is sued, and you've implemented the changes recommended by the auditor, it may help convince a jury that your company did, in fact, take reasonable steps to secure information, according to Goodnow.
(Image: tpsdave via Pixabay)

Know The Law

Data breaches are dealt with differently in different jurisdictions, which means laws vary from country to country and from state to state. Failing to understand the differences can increase liability exposure, which may take the form of fines in addition to lawsuit costs.

"Most businesses have no idea what the law is on this. Know the law. Read it at a minimum, look it up online, or even better, hire a lawyer to help you develop a system to respond to a data breach," Goodnow said.

Also, consider a security audit from a credible third party. If your company is sued, and you've implemented the changes recommended by the auditor, it may help convince a jury that your company did, in fact, take reasonable steps to secure information, according to Goodnow.

(Image: tpsdave via Pixabay)

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