10 Highest Paying Computer Science Programs - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
IT Life
News
8/27/2015
07:06 AM
David Wagner
David Wagner
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

10 Highest Paying Computer Science Programs

Computer science majors from these 10 schools can expect to earn the most by the time they reach the middle of their careers, according to data from Payscale.com. See how your salary stacks up.
Previous
1 of 12
Next

(Image: 401k 2012 via Flickr)

(Image: 401k 2012 via Flickr)

 

Payscale.com released its 2015-16 College Salary Report on Aug. 26, and among the highlights of the report is the list of colleges with the highest paid alumni. This year, the list shows that the shipping industry is a good career choice, with alumni salaries for graduates of SUNY Maritime College outpacing top schools, such as Harvey Mudd and Harvard.

If you're more interested in working in tech than you are in sailing the high seas, we've extracted details on the colleges that offer the best earnings potential for computer science majors.

To compile its report, Payscale.com pulled median salary data from graduates of more than 1,500 US schools, including more than 1,000 institutions offering Bachelor degrees and more than 400 graduate schools. The average number of responses from each school was 325, and only schools deemed to have a statistically significant number of responses were considered in the report.

Payscale broke the median salary data down into "early career" (less than five years of experience) and "mid-career" (at least 10 years of experience). The salary results are not compiled according to specific jobs, but rather based on college majors.

Our list, based on the Payscale data, ranks the top 10 schools whose computer science alumni have the highest median mid-career salaries. While our list also shows the early-career salaries for each school, we opted not to use that information as our ranking criteria because recent graduates' earnings are often affected by geography and other outside influences. By mid-career, most of the noise has been filtered out.

Reporting on the median salaries of those who majored in computer science doesn't give us the full picture of what IT pros are earning, since many of you are not computer science majors.  Still, it's a useful guide to what graduates from the top-earning schools are being paid now, and offers CIOs and other hiring managers insight into what they can expect to pay for IT talent.

[ Finding the right job involves more than playing with keywords. Read 10 IT Job Search Habits To Nail A New Gig. ]

Check out the list. You'll find at least two surprises, in my opinion, including the schools coming in at No. 4 and No. 1.

See how your salary stacks up against your fellow alumni, and against the computer science majors at rival schools. Use it for bragging rights around the watercooler. Share it with your HR department. Use it for hiring decisions. Or, if you're just starting out in IT, consult the list to help you find the best path to success.

If you don't see your school on our top 10 rankings, check out the complete Payscale list here. Show your school spirit in the comments section below.

David has been writing on business and technology for over 10 years and was most recently Managing Editor at Enterpriseefficiency.com. Before that he was an Assistant Editor at MIT Sloan Management Review, where he covered a wide range of business topics including IT, ... View Full Bio

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 12
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Some Guy
50%
50%
Some Guy,
User Rank: Strategist
9/1/2015 | 11:40:25 AM
All depends on chance
As to whether it all depends on chance, the ANOVA would tell you that, too. In fact you would find the correlation of each factor: individual, school, degree, company, starting salary, location, manager, etc. What's left over is chance (which won't be 100% either, any more than any of the other factors).
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
9/1/2015 | 11:04:47 AM
Re: Never wanted to be a scientist
@TerryB, interesting point, thanks for sharing...

I would like to add... it also knowing what question to ask/asking right question:)

plus ability to deal with dead line...

how I see it :)

anyone else - please do share :)

 
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
9/1/2015 | 11:02:15 AM
Re: Pretty Specious Post Hoc Falacy
@Some Guy I would say it all depends on the chance... as I know some people in sales with right skills and right IT degree but no luck:(...
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
9/1/2015 | 10:59:36 AM
Re: Never wanted to be a scientist
@Broadway0474, I  would say with MBA it more like gives you better option to get foot in the door...

also now some Canadian Unverst. do offer MBA tech/IT... 
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
9/1/2015 | 10:56:52 AM
Re: Never wanted to be a scientist
@mejiac, I would say you right on the money... but with technology you never know... as it also luck of the draw... as other factors in play... like let say economy... How I see it...
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
9/1/2015 | 10:54:56 AM
Re: Eh, Computer Science programs
@progman2000, same here please do count me in too... as at my time some IT edu. programs never exist it... 

anyone else in the same boat ???
mejiac
50%
50%
mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2015 | 11:18:29 PM
Re: Never wanted to be a scientist
@vnewman2,

I share your comments. And as your clearly point out, the cost of living is one of the reasons for high salaries. In other regions in the US salarios might not be as high, but because of lower cost of living they're very competitive.

Choosing your career path if very important, and Silicon Valley can be a very important milestone,
Broadway0474
50%
50%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2015 | 9:28:16 PM
Re: Never wanted to be a scientist
I think you make a valid point about innate skills. But what a great MBA will give you is auto cred---finance knowledge yes, but also an auto stamp of approval for the fast track.
vnewman2
50%
50%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2015 | 7:00:07 PM
Re: Never wanted to be a scientist
It doesn't surprise me that so many California schools made it to this list.  Salaries are typically higher here (in most regions) people cost of living is higher, plus there is a steady demand for this type of employment because of Silicon Valley.

 
mejiac
50%
50%
mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2015 | 4:34:10 PM
Re: Never wanted to be a scientist
@Broadway0474,

To add to your comment (since I got and MBA and the same basis as you point out below),

To go up the corporate ladder, or to try and branch out on your own has a lot to do if it's part of your skill set.

I know many developers that have the aptitud towards business. Many of the PMs that I work with are just phenomanal at managing both the project the delivery and keeping the numbers in check (talking the same lingo as accounting)... but it's part of there skill set.

I know many other dev and technical folks that are superb at what they do, but just don't seem inclined to go down the path that lean more on the business/financial say.

For some it has to do with the fact things aren't black or white, and there is some gray area that you need to learn to navigate (soft and people skills)

For others, it's simply does not interest them.

In my case, I do want to go up that ladder, and need to ramp up my finance skills to get there.

What do you think?
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
2018 State of the Cloud
2018 State of the Cloud
Cloud adoption is growing, but how are organizations taking advantage of it? Interop ITX and InformationWeek surveyed technology decision-makers to find out, read this report to discover what they had to say!
News
IT Budgets: Traditional Still Bigger than Cloud
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  9/20/2018
Commentary
Building a Smart City Doesn't Have a Common Blueprint
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  9/18/2018
Commentary
AWS vs. Azure: Users Share Their Experiences
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  9/7/2018
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
The Next Generation of IT Support
The workforce is changing as businesses become global and technology erodes geographical and physical barriers.IT organizations are critical to enabling this transition and can utilize next-generation tools and strategies to provide world-class support regardless of location, platform or device
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll