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4/2/2015
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10 Management Books Every CIO Should Read

On the rare occasions when you do have time to read, these hand-picked titles will give you a return on your investment.
7 of 13

Leadership Lessons

Title:: The Un-Bossy Boss: 12 Powerful Questions to Make You a Great Manager

Author: Gary Magenta

This is the book for people who have read The No Asshole Rule and see themselves in the book's title. This book will reform anyone who may have started off his or her management career on the wrong foot.

It is especially useful in the IT world, where many people get promoted for their technical skills, but lack the people skills to succeed in management. Like many books, the Un-Bossy Boss combines anecdotes and easy formulas for improving yourself as a manager. The devil is in the details here. This book gets the details right more than many other books of its ilk.

(Image: Amazon)

Leadership Lessons

Title:: The Un-Bossy Boss: 12 Powerful Questions to Make You a Great Manager

Author: Gary Magenta

This is the book for people who have read The No Asshole Rule and see themselves in the book's title. This book will reform anyone who may have started off his or her management career on the wrong foot.

It is especially useful in the IT world, where many people get promoted for their technical skills, but lack the people skills to succeed in management. Like many books, the Un-Bossy Boss combines anecdotes and easy formulas for improving yourself as a manager. The devil is in the details here. This book gets the details right more than many other books of its ilk.

(Image: Amazon)

7 of 13
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David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
4/6/2015 | 6:03:09 PM
Re: The Phoenix Project rang true
@danielcawrey- Well, I'm of the general attitude that everybody is a startup these days the way things move. But I susppse if you work for the right kind of well-heeled, legacy-filled blue blood company, it might not apply. But i think at this point we're all gasping for time, money, creativity, etc just like a startup. And we all need new ideas fast.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
4/6/2015 | 6:00:48 PM
Re: Good to Great
@chris- I very seriously considered Good to Great, but I didn't for the simple reason that many of those "great" companies are now no longer great. I don't blame Collins for this. Leadership changes. The world changes. Etc. Collins actually recognized this when he wrote "How the Mighty Fall," 

But i just felt like while some of the lessons are still apropriate, some of the case studies are not (even with some of the updates of the later editions).

That said, I think i want to feature some Collins books in a future book list as I do believe he's quite good.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
4/6/2015 | 5:56:36 PM
Re: The Phoenix Project rang true
@whalton3031- Thanks for the endoresement. It is especially nice when a book helps us through the worst times. I think one of the hardest thing about writing management books is they often have to assume an ideal world. If you have time to do x,y, and z you will succeed. Sometimes, the crisis makes x, y, and z impossible. What then?
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
4/3/2015 | 9:41:39 AM
Good to Great
I would add Good to Great, as an unabashed Jim Collins fan. Clear-eyed perspective on the role of technology in company transformation -- its limits and its power.

And "The Goal." The Phoenix Project is something of tech-centric ode to The Goal, so that's on my to-read list. At last year's InformationWeek Conference ex-Netlfix cloud architect Adrian Cockcroft recommened Phoenix Project -- I'm overdue to get it read! 

 
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