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1/6/2015
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Jeff Bertolucci
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10 Signs You've Hired The Wrong Person

Is the new guy Mr. Negative? Does he shout at the espresso machine? Look for these warning signs before you make the hire.
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The constant complainer

This gloomy grouser -- call him Cecil B. DeMoan -- hates everything from the get-go. The office coffee is undrinkable swill. His parking spot is too far from the building. And maybe he's always shooting down other people's ideas without offering alternatives or any sort of constructive input whatsoever. Sounds like it's time for a closed-door heart-to-heart between the new hire and his boss, who probably shouldn't expect a sudden and miraculous personality upgrade. If Cecil's disposition doesn't improve, the company may have to let him go -- unless his skills prove so valuable that they're willing to endure his dourness and cynicism.

The constant complainer
This gloomy grouser -- call him Cecil B. DeMoan -- hates everything from the get-go. The office coffee is undrinkable swill. His parking spot is too far from the building. And maybe he's always shooting down other people's ideas without offering alternatives or any sort of constructive input whatsoever. Sounds like it's time for a closed-door heart-to-heart between the new hire and his boss, who probably shouldn't expect a sudden and miraculous personality upgrade. If Cecil's disposition doesn't improve, the company may have to let him go -- unless his skills prove so valuable that they're willing to endure his dourness and cynicism.

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SamRay
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SamRay,
User Rank: Strategist
1/11/2015 | 10:07:32 PM
C# Corner article
A couple of your ideas are much like ones in the article "Top 10 Things You May Not Say To Your Boss" in the C# Corner (c-sharpcorner.com) web site. I do not know which came first. Your "That's not my job" is like "That's not part of my job" and "At my old job..." is like "At my last job we did it this way". You might also find the comments for that article interesting.

Mahesh and I collaborated on the article "Top 8 Things You Should Not Say To a Developer" in C# Corner.

As for "That's not my job", do you not allow the person whose job it is to complain? Do you really expect someone to do something they are not qualified to do if there is someone that is qualified and is being paid to do it? You proably meant to say that a person that does not do something they are legitamately asked to (and should) do then that is a clear problem but I think the way it was said can be easily misinterpreted.

As for "At my old job...", do you not want to get the benefit of someone's experience? You (your employer at least) is probably paying for the experience. Sure, if someone dwells on the past and does not want to do things the way your organization needs it to be done then that could be a problem but if you are not open to ideas then that could be a problem.

 

Note to editors of this site: I wish you had provided a warning that links are not allowed instead of notifying us after the fact. How about disabling the dialog we get when we push the links button?
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
1/9/2015 | 7:51:24 PM
Re: an average hiring process yields average results
@Technocrati -  "The job of the manager to mitigate and move constructively forward."  Exactly.  

But funny how most managers - especially in IT -  don't realize this - I'm guessing because possessing the type of people skills that would allow you to pull this off are at odds with what makes someone a good tech worker.  

Does anyone here work for a former techie turned manager that is stellar on both fronts?  Inquiring minds want to know!
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
1/9/2015 | 2:06:22 PM
Re: an average hiring process yields average results

@vnewman2    Well said.  Really this is simple stuff.   Mgt 101 as you mention and the fact that we are discussing the basics shows how difficult this problem is.   Often managers have little managerial experience when they get their first "big break" and then they go into CYA for the rest of their going no-where career.  

 

I have seen this at every company, the person in position of responsibility who just is good at "acting responsible" but when it comes down to it they always show that they are in over their heads.  

But ironically they don't often loose their jobs - they are more apt to use whatever means they can to stay where they are at.  Scruples and Morality were probably lost in college - if they even have that.

I just recently experienced this first hand (again),  and while not every employee is "optimal" - it is the job of the manager to mitigate and move constructively forward. 

 

That next step usually never happens.

tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
1/9/2015 | 9:56:53 AM
Re: re; Re: an average hiring process yields average results
My current job has a six month probation period. It is daunting to think about especially in this job market. Unfortunately most states are "at will" so you work at the company's pleasure. Then again the employee is also free to leave when they want to as well.
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
1/9/2015 | 9:43:31 AM
Re: an average hiring process yields average results
Agreed you have to work with the new person. It is in everyone's best interest for this person to succeed. Especially since today companies take their time in hiring a person.
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
1/9/2015 | 9:39:44 AM
Re: an average hiring process yields average results
Management is the problem most of the time! They need to ensure that the new hire is a success and do everyting they can to help them succeed. But a key item to look for in the hiring process is how the new hire will fit into the culture of the new company. They could be bright, outgoing and witty but if your company culture is to have quiet insecure introverts, that could be a mismatch. Some companies want their managers to micromanage, others take a hands off view and let you sink or swim. It is really wide open today. 
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
1/9/2015 | 9:31:52 AM
The Interview Process
Given that the interview process today is so legnthy it is hard to imagine a company hiring a bad fit. But since we are all human, it does happen. Most of these tip offs are about negative people. Usually you can spot that during a thorough interview process.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
1/8/2015 | 12:47:48 PM
Re: an average hiring process yields average results
@freespirit - it is much easier for those, especially in management positions, to be unable or unwilling to look within themselves to see if they are part of the problem.  There's a Farsi saying my friend uses that translates to: "You have sight for others but are blind to yourself."

Part of the reason is when you run the show, you call the shots, so in theory if someone doesn't act the way you want them to, it's your perogative to get rid of them.

But an insightful manager will be able to identify the people who have potential and cultivate it in such a way it suits the individual and the company.

My personal example is that my boss will give my coworker a task like completing a printer refresh by Jan 31 - our lease for this equipment is up and said printers have to be sent back by that time.  So, that's the task.  He's the kind of guy who will say to himself - this is easy, can be done in one day - so he will leave it to the last minute.  She will turn into a stress case and badger him about it and complain he's not doing his work.  In my opinion, if she wants him to do the task a certain way, she needs to tell him, 'By the end of the week Jan 9, I expect you to have 4 printers replaced.  Then email me the serial numbers.  Then I want you to update the inventory sheet.  By Jan 16, etc..."

You can't give someone a task that general and expect them to do it the exact same way you would.  It's like MGT 101 and I don't understand how you get to be a manager without knowing this.
freespiritny25
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freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
1/8/2015 | 11:01:10 AM
Re: an average hiring process yields average results
@ Li Tan Very true. I worked under poor management before and my manager used to complain to me that the entire department was full of "idiots" that "don't get it". Clearly, she had no insight as to how she had contributed to the lack of structure and approptiate training in the department. 
freespiritny25
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freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
1/8/2015 | 10:58:23 AM
Re: an average hiring process yields average results
@ Laurianne I agree, you can usually tell within a couple of weeks!
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