10 Sweet Job Perks In Tech - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
IT Life
News
3/15/2015
12:05 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

10 Sweet Job Perks In Tech

Free snacks are yesterday's news. Now tech companies offer $10,000 office decoration budgets and helicopter rides. Here's a look at what Google, Pinterest, Airbnb, Facebook, and others offer employees.
Previous
1 of 12
Next

Image: Wikipedia
Image: Wikipedia

By now, it's common knowledge that the benefits of working at many tech companies go far beyond health insurance and paid vacation days. Tech businesses trying to hire and retain top talent are starting to get creative in terms of what they offer employees.

When you think of where the best perks are offered, Google is usually top of mind. After all, the company offers free gourmet meals, nap pods, massages, and even a concierge service to take care of personal duties like party and home-improvement planning. Its over-the-top headquarters reflect the growing trend of offering excessive benefits to talented employees.

While Google is one of the bigger household names, there are plenty of sweet job perks offered at a broad range of tech companies, from software giants to small startups. My personal favorites on this list? Helicopter rides, frequent trips to the Apple store, and the ability to take a dog to work.  

In most cases, benefits like unlimited (and free) vacation and fully stocked kitchens are intended to lure in top talent and keep people from hunting for new gigs. Yet some perks are pretty sneaky at keeping employees working in the office for longer hours per day. If they are offered free gourmet dinner or in-office exercise classes, workers don't need to worry about leaving to grab lunch or hit the gym.

[iPhone Will Sport 'Force Touch' Tech Later This Year]

Lavish perks have become ubiquitous throughout the tech industry. The trend has even created a job category of its own. Many businesses now hire "workplace coordinators" who lead teams that aim to cater to employees' wishes, the Wall Street Journal reports. They fly under the radar and function as a sort of concierge service, responsible for planning office happy hours and keeping the kitchen stocked with favorite snacks. 

It seems excessive, but such job positions are necessary when successful tech companies grow to hundreds or thousands of employees. In a market where tech wizards receive multiple job offers and sky-high salaries right out of college, interesting perks like fitness classes, game rooms, and haircuts can make a big difference in whether a company gains or loses valuable talent.  

As the perks get bigger, employees try to push their boundaries. One worker at Pinterest asked the company to build a zip line to a nearby bar. At Adobe, another inquired about the possibility of getting a Slip 'n Slide for use during the day. The zip line got a no, unfortunately, but Chris Lavoie, global event strategist at Adobe, spoke more vaguely about the slide. "I'm not making any promises," he admitted to the Journal.

They may not have zip lines, but some of the perks at today's tech companies are pretty outrageous. Click through to see what's on offer. If you could have any job perk, what would it be? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Previous
1 of 12
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Kelly22
50%
50%
Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
3/23/2015 | 9:50:42 AM
Re: Dress code
I also think dress code depends largely on business. If you're meeting with clients, yes, you should look put-together and professional. For folks behind the scenes, though, I'd say wear what you want so long as you do the job well. It seems like business dress is becoming less enforced; I once interviewed at a company where my interviewer showed up in cargo shorts.
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
3/18/2015 | 10:20:47 AM
Re: Dress code
Technorati, 

"Because I have experience "haters" just because I choose to dress with some sense of style and self respect. Not to mention I get the job done."

That's the most important. I think you are the one who is right dressing with sense of style and self-respect. But, well, if I am not in the gym I don't feel comfortable wearing such clothes for anything else, let alone a work environment. 

-Susan
Kelly22
50%
50%
Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
3/17/2015 | 8:49:30 AM
Re: Google has the Ticket
@gary_el I also get a boost of productivity after some exercise. Usually I just take a walk around the block at lunch, but a gym would be great! 
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
3/17/2015 | 5:27:36 AM
Yoga, ball pits, dressing up for themed days ...
I loved that about getting dressed up for themed days. :D So much fun gets employees in a great good mood, which in turn translates into productiivity. What a great idea. 

I also like that many of the companies mentioned offer free yoga classes and a Zen meditation room. The benefits of yoga and meditation clearly refects in productivity as well and a great feeling of general joy and welbeing. 

That ball pit, hmm. So much fun as well. :D I have seen people in meetings in one of those ball pits at the Slush startup conference in Helsinki. 

There is no doubt that the office environment is changing for good, admiting that employees are human beings and not a piece of rigid furniture is a great step.

-Susan 
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
3/17/2015 | 5:05:32 AM
Re: The Ultimate Perk
[email protected],

" ... open the fridge as many times I want ... "

That's one of the things I love the most from working from home. :D The silence, and not having anyone around when I am working. If sometimes I feel like having people around I just go to a café and work from there for a while. But it can't be a very crowded café. :) 

-Susan
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
3/17/2015 | 5:00:09 AM
Re: Dress code
[email protected]

Why do you feel more comfortable in casual wear? 

-Susan
Kelly22
50%
50%
Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
3/16/2015 | 11:47:51 PM
Re: Clean My House, Please
That's what it sounds like. Here's a separate article on it: http://www.slate.com/articles/business/building_a_better_workplace/2014/09/precation_perks_companies_offer_employees_vacation_before_they_start.html

Apparently it's called a precation (I didn't realize it had an official name), and it sounds awesome. Another perk of the startup world, it seems. Though it's early to call it a trend, I guess, it's something that companies are doing. 
Kelly22
50%
50%
Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
3/16/2015 | 5:14:37 PM
Re: Dress code
100% with you on that front; I am much more productive in casual wear. Luckily I work in a casual environment, but I know a lot of people (in finance, mostly) who have to get suited up for work every day. For those who don't need to interact with clients, I don't see the point of enforcing a strict office dress code. 
Kelly22
50%
50%
Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
3/16/2015 | 5:11:07 PM
Re: Clean My House, Please
I also give credit to the businesses that are incentivizing vacation time - great way to keep employees happy! Staying on the grind 24/7 isn't good for employee health or productivity. 

It's not in this story, but I've also heard of employers who give the benefit of vacation time to new employees before they start. Instead of starting right away, the new worker is given a sort of grace period during which they take the time to relax. The idea is that they'll start their new role refreshed and ready to go. 

Also, I'd choose working in a treehouse over working from home any day :)
Ariella
50%
50%
Ariella,
User Rank: Author
3/16/2015 | 2:02:00 PM
Re: Dress code
@[email protected] casual dress is fairly common today, though I recall a few years ago a tie (though not a full suit) was required dress for IT at a major bank.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
InformationWeek Is Getting an Upgrade!

Find out more about our plans to improve the look, functionality, and performance of the InformationWeek site in the coming months.

News
Remote Work Tops SF, NYC for Most High-Paying Job Openings
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  7/20/2021
Slideshows
Blockchain Gets Real Across Industries
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  7/22/2021
Commentary
Seeking a Competitive Edge vs. Chasing Savings in the Cloud
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  7/19/2021
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
2021 State of ITOps and SecOps Report
2021 State of ITOps and SecOps Report
This new report from InformationWeek explores what we've learned over the past year, critical trends around ITOps and SecOps, and where leaders are focusing their time and efforts to support a growing digital economy. Download it today!
Video
Current Issue
Monitoring Critical Cloud Workloads Report
In this report, our experts will discuss how to advance your ability to monitor critical workloads as they move about the various cloud platforms in your company.
Slideshows
Flash Poll