6 Job Search Apps That Restore Your Dignity - InformationWeek

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5/9/2015
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6 Job Search Apps That Restore Your Dignity

While some apps seek to make the job search as quick and carefree as possible, these attempt to restore dignity to a process that feels increasingly commodity-driven.
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(Image: Geralt via Pixabay)

(Image: Geralt via Pixabay)

If looking for a job makes you feel like a product for sale, or like someone who isn't respected as a human being, then these job apps are for you. Each app has at least one unique feature designed to help you feel just a bit less like a resume and a bit more like a valued individual.

These are nothing like Tinder for jobs. While those kinds of apps give job seekers plenty of freedom, and freedom is often good, they can also leave hiring managers with the perception that a prospective employee isn't all that committed to the position.

After all, if you use a job search app that is similar to one designed to find a one-night stand, chances are you might treat the job like a one night stand, as well. Likewise, job candidates can be left feeling used and discarded by employers using such apps to make hiring choices. And that isn't good for the hiring company, or the job seeker, in the long run.

While some apps seek to make the job search as quick and carefree as possible, others attempt to restore dignity to a process that feels increasingly commodity-driven.

It may not be possible to entirely re-humanize the job search. HR still uses checklists and search engines to go through resumes. In the end, the treatment you get depends more on the companies you apply to than the apps you're using. But the creators of the apps we're featuring here have listened to your pain points and attempted to solve them.

Check them out, and see if any of them will help you feel better about your next job search. And then tell us in the comments section below what your biggest pains are when you go searching for a job -- or when you try to hire someone for an open position in your company.

David has been writing on business and technology for over 10 years and was most recently Managing Editor at Enterpriseefficiency.com. Before that he was an Assistant Editor at MIT Sloan Management Review, where he covered a wide range of business topics including IT, ... View Full Bio

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impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
5/13/2015 | 3:05:32 PM
Re: Job Hunting no longer has a human touch

I am not sure it is as simple as a reply email box. I think it would be very time consuming to reply to all rejected candidates unless there was a one click type of solution in the their recruiting application that produced a standard rejection email vetted by legal. Years ago many companies sent snail mail rejection letters so it is possible, but the volume of resumes received today makes rejection more of an issue for already taxed HR departments.

Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:44:04 PM
Re: Job Hunting no longer has a human touch
@Dave I've been in a similar situation - applied, interviewed, follow-up (twice) then nothing. The interview seemed to go well and I thought it was a poor reflection on the company that I never heard a response. Even if they had decided to go with another candidate, I would have preferred to receive a rejection than hear nothing at all.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:34:41 PM
Re: personal emails?
@soozyg- Just to clarify, i mean personal corporate email, not the email they use at home. Personal vs a no-reply email. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:33:12 PM
Re: Job Hunting no longer has a human touch
@brian.dean- I generally agree with you that not getting back to an applicant is a potential business error. I was interviewed for a position once that I wanted quite a lot. I thought the interview went well. I followed up with a thank you and was told I'd hear back in a week. I let two weeks go by, sent a polite followup and never heard back. A week later i sent another email saying that I had another job offer (which was true), but that I'd have preferred the job with them, and I asked if they had a sense of the timing. They never responded.

I have no idea if they hired anyone for that position. But I know I said to myself i'd never apply to another job there. If they did that to enough talent, there'd be a lot of people out and around saying, "hey, don't apply there. They left me hanging." Eventually, that hurts your hiring.

Probably a coincidence, but that company went out of business recently.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:28:20 PM
Re: Hired (the app)
@brian.dean- Well, i agree with you that it changes the dynamic. I'm not sure about lowering the offer though. I think the offers actually go up, because companies know they are in open competition for this person. They will be receiving multiple bids in a week. If you aim low, they may ignore your offer.

Either way there are two things to note:

1) This only works where the job has scarcity (like software development or perhaps welding which is in high demand).

2) It takes the guess work out of the annoying "who will show their cards first about salary" dance everyone does.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:25:03 PM
Re: posted job are old jobs
@soozyg- Yes, there are even apps that claim to somehow find that hidden percentage. I don't quite understand how. I think the number of invisible jobs went down during the financial crisis because employers knew there were lots of people competing for jobs. The most recent number i saw was 80% (which is still high). It will be interesting to see where that number goes as the job market heats up.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:22:45 PM
Re: personal emails?
@soozyg- I'm only reporting what was said to me by the founder. I know some companies don't like to respond simply because the response can be used against them. 

But to be honest, i'd say even from big companies I got most of my responses back from personal email addresses so clearly some  HR is not taking advantage of some of the options available. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:18:21 PM
Re: "Dignity" is sthe word
@Mejiac- Glad to be of service. I hope the next time (if there has to be a next time) will go easier for you. I appreciate finding apps like these, because it reminds me at least some developers remember that customers are people and not just downloads.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/11/2015 | 12:18:21 PM
Re: "Dignity" is sthe word
@Mejiac- Glad to be of service. I hope the next time (if there has to be a next time) will go easier for you. I appreciate finding apps like these, because it reminds me at least some developers remember that customers are people and not just downloads.
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