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6/24/2015
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9 Ways Technology Is Slowly Killing Us All

The cost of technology addiction goes beyond pricey gadgets. Connectivity also affects vision, memory loss, weight gain and self-esteem.
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Blink. Blink Again. 
When staring at a screen for long periods of time, you usually forget to blink. The habit leads to a condition called 'computer vision syndrome,' which leads to dry eyes, fatigue, irritation, headaches, problems focusing, or neck and shoulder pain. Also known as digital eyestrain, it has become more prevalent as people spend more time using electronic devices.
Computer vision syndrome doesn't cause lasting eye damage but it's still important to take necessary precautions. Limit the amount of time you spend in front of a screen and take frequent breaks. Keep some eye drops at your desk in case irritation starts to occur.
(Image: Brandsurfers)

Blink. Blink Again.

When staring at a screen for long periods of time, you usually forget to blink. The habit leads to a condition called "computer vision syndrome," which leads to dry eyes, fatigue, irritation, headaches, problems focusing, or neck and shoulder pain. Also known as digital eyestrain, it has become more prevalent as people spend more time using electronic devices.

Computer vision syndrome doesn't cause lasting eye damage but it's still important to take necessary precautions. Limit the amount of time you spend in front of a screen and take frequent breaks. Keep some eye drops at your desk in case irritation starts to occur.

(Image: Brandsurfers)

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impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
6/25/2015 | 12:11:20 AM
Positives and negative

I am guilty of some of these vices but I still think that there are benefits to the evolution of tech. The challenge for users is balancing all the great positives of our devices with the negatives. Many vices we enjoy have the potential for addictive behavior if not managed and tech is just another one on the list. Awareness is the first step to addressing the issues.

SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 12:53:35 AM
Re: Positives and negative
Social isolation is a serious issue. People who don't interact are labeled introverts but when you go online you can see that these real life introverts are amazingly skilled in expressing themselves on Facebook or twitter. This happens because when they go online and when they come back to the real life they subconsciously set high standards of communication and cannot communicate to others when they see communication in real life is so basic.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 12:59:05 AM
Re: Positives and negative
There are more positives than negative but you cannot deny that the body goes through so much because of technology. Nowadays children and teenagers don't even look up from their smartphones and don't pay attention to the surroundings. People who haven't been the victims of the smartphone age, I.e. people who are in their early to mid twenties keep a balanced act.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 11:09:56 AM
Re: Positives and negative
@Sunita, Very true. The balancing act is difficult for many kids and adults. I have to make a conscious effort to not be hooked to technology by making sure I read books, paint, go for walks, and socialize with others in person.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
6/25/2015 | 11:59:16 AM
Re: Positives and negative
I agree that the younge kids need to be managed when using technology I have seen many teenagers and college students talk to me while reading their phones and not even understand that it's rude and disrespectful . The issue isn't with having technology the issue is how you use your technology every day and the implications it has to your social and professional relationships . I use technology as a reward for good behavior with my young child she doesn't get to use her technology if her behavior is not appropriate. BTW I don't think the problem is just with kids I've seen many adults come to social gatherings and stare at their phone the entire time . I also think that this is unacceptable .
JediSQL
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JediSQL,
User Rank: Guru
6/25/2015 | 12:38:51 PM
Re: Positives and negative
@impactnow, Society is moving inexorably from an monotasking mode of interaction to a multitasking mode.  Monotasking mode exists only because it was previously the only mode available.  Among the young that are not burdened by the accepted constraints of the past, they cannot imagine a world without multitasking interaction.  It has nothing to do with etiquette or respect.  The waves the new will always break away the rocks of the old. Imbrace the new or become a dinosaur that is locked out of the market of the young.
Zman7
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Zman7,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2015 | 1:33:22 PM
Re: Positives and negative
Sorry, but there's no such thing as multitasking mode. Humans can't multitask - they can only switch between individual tasks. And yes, it's very disrespectful and impolite to do. If someone takes a text or call while in a conversation with me, they are saying that the other person is more important. I end the conversation right there and walk away. More and more people are doing this too.

It's embrace - not imbrace. (Poor proofreading is a sign of failing to multitask.)
JediSQL
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JediSQL,
User Rank: Guru
6/25/2015 | 1:55:30 PM
Re: Positives and negative
@Zuman7, yes, you are so completely right.  The fact that I misspelled a word so certainly proves I am absolutely wrong and an abject moron.

Multitasking is generally accepted as the quick switching between individual tasks.  None the less, animals perform your definition of multitasking all the time.  We walk, breath, eat and watch for danger simultaneouly all the time.
Zman7
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Zman7,
User Rank: Strategist
6/26/2015 | 12:29:01 PM
Re: Positives and negative
JediSQL

Involuntary actions that are required to sustain life are not tasks.

Do a little research on multitasking. The ineffectiveness of the human brain for multitasking has been demonstrated in many different studies. Attempting to multitask can reduce productivity by approximately 40-percent according to some researchers. 

Have fun trying to multitask. Your peers who can focus will leave you far behind in life.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
6/26/2015 | 3:22:03 PM
Re: Positives and negative
I've read that there are a select few humans who are lucky enough to be able to efficiently multitask in the true sense of the word because of a special exception in the hard-wiring of their brains. The rest of us are fooling ourselves. Some are better than others at switching between tasks effectively, but doing "more than one thing at a time" doesn't allow you to fully process any of them especially if they are content-similar (talking on the phone and writing this post for instance, which I am doing now and so far I've missed half of what this person is saying...)
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
6/27/2015 | 12:15:26 PM
Re: Positives and negative
@vnewman2: We all multitask but to a lesser degree. We do it subconsciously. While driving a car you are doing so many activities at once. Suppose you attend to a call. That is plus one activity in itself. 
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2015 | 1:13:05 PM
Re: Positives and negative
But @SunitaT0 - that's why talking/texting and driving is dangerous and illegal in many states!  It isn't safe.  We may try to do it, yes, but we don't do it well.  
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 11:27:36 AM
Re: Positives and negative
@Sunita, I agree. I have a friend that comments and "likes" photos on our former childhood classmate's page. When we saw the childhood friend, she dodged behing a clothes rack in Macy's to avoid speaking to her in person. I thought this was very odd. The next day, she was back to liking the childhood friend's posts. There is definitely a component of social issues and technology linked together in that scenario.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 11:05:05 AM
Re: Positives and negative
This article pins the nail right in the head. The children have "digital babysitters." Kids sometimes act out on purpose, because they know they will be rewarded with tech time. It is manipulative, but parents do it because its easier than enforcing discipline. The long term effects is not worth it.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
6/25/2015 | 12:47:10 PM
Re: Positives and negative
It's important to note it not only kids that overuse technology and negatively impact social relationships I've seen many adults who think it's perfectly acceptable to stare at the phone while talking. Many things in life can be addictive but also enjoyable the key is to manage usage and impacts.
beforewww
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beforewww,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2015 | 12:44:01 PM
Re: Positives and negative
Everything has pros and cons, technology has brought the world to us in a manner of speaking.

Access to almost everything, radios allowing us to hear voices accross the air waves, Televisions allowing people to see the first man walk on the moon, giving us information and entertainment, modern advances is technology allowing a small watch act as a computer, all of these developments and marketed technical ideas give us the world in many ways, and to many of us.

As anything good, abuse of technology, dependency of it, is also harmful on many levels.

I see entire families at restaurants, eating, watching their tablets, texting, lost in conversation with a friend.

It is a world closer away from each other, not being able to put down or turn off any device, it is hurting society.

People are not smiling at the table, they are stressing over the next text, email or podcast coming up. Imagine the the stress level, imagine the distance, sitting next to each other, but worlds apart. Yes, without the individual control and detachment when needed, we are just slaves to technology, and we don't even need a "Terminator Judgement Day", technoology is already taking over, and we are allowing this to happen.

As an electronics engineer, and pioneer in the computing industry, I see how we are allowign ourselves to get lost in a world drifting us away from the beauty of life.

We need to learn to manage our lives and technology to our advantage, not our demise. 
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 7:45:11 AM
Knowledge
The important thing now is that while technology may not help us lead healthy lives, the information is out there how to do it. There is no real excuse not to exercise or eat healthy when even 10 minutes of research online will give you all the details you need. 


Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 11:08:02 AM
Re: Knowledge
@ Whoopty, We have all of the resources and knowledge at the tip of our fingertips, but sometimes we can be our own worst enemies. We might still cling onto unhealthy habits, because we lack the self-control, discipline, or motivation.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 9:50:31 AM
Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
The author and subject of the first page interview makes many assertions, but doesn't give any actual data to back this up. He's not even a scientist - he's an activist. I recall hearing the exact same arguments when video game systems came out, then computer games. 

Children adapt to their environment. I can asset, from personal observation, that it seems many parents are glad to let the kids play with tablets and phones to keep them quiet. However, I don't know that this is causing "social isolation" - this is just the way they play now. Back in the 60s and 70s, kids would play with their toys in their bedroom, now they play on tablets. What's the difference? The eeeeeevil electronics! I don't think there is any more or less intereaction among kids than there has been in the past. If anything, there is more intereaction due to social media.

As for all these other things, there is usually some misinterpretation of so called "scientific" data that asserts things such as "sitting is bad for you" - give it 10 years and another study will come out that says "standing is killing you". Most of these make great fodder for "journalists" because they don't really have to investigate the source - if it is a scientific paper, for example, it is assumed to be credible. For years, they said eggs will kill you - now they are good. Red meat was going to make you die sooner - now it is great. Exercise will make you thinner - now it's more aobut genetics and exercise really doesn't make you lose weight. Always remember to look for the motiviation - either they are getting grant money to make a point or they are doing it for personal reasons and they are backed by some university that gets richer every year.

We don't have any truly objective scientists anymore. Don't freak out about articles, especially online ones. Just live life and enjoy the journey.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
6/27/2015 | 3:32:33 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
@GAProgrammer "I can asset, from personal observation, that it seems many parents are glad to let the kids play with tablets and phones to keep them quiet."

I have also seen this behavior myself. Specially from young mothers. And I agree, I don't believe it's such a bad thing. Just different toys.

Perhaps, we're seeing the next Steve Jobs, Bill Gates or Elon Musk in the making.
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
6/28/2015 | 10:26:33 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
mak63, as a parent who sticks devices in my children's hands when we're out to dinner --- and usually trying to pull it out of their hands at home --- I can say the big determinent with "screen time" is what's on. Mindless games or something that's teaching them their ABCs? A violent, silly cartoon, or something with an educational component?
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
6/29/2015 | 7:02:30 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
>Perhaps, we're seeing the next Steve Jobs, Bill Gates or Elon Musk in the making.

That will only happen if people are using devices to create rather than to consume or get lost in social media labor.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:01:39 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
@Thomas Claburn,

"people are using devices to create rather than to consume or get lost in social media labor."

I think this is key.

My 6 year old loves to watch youtube videos of toy reviews and anything else he's into (Cartoons and Video Games). But as a Geek, I knkow what and what not to expose him (reason why I love Youtube safe filter feature).

My son spending time watching what he likes is ok, but bot me and my wife make sure he doesn't get an overload and we're fully aware of whatever his exposed to.

So far the experience has been positive, but we're well aware that we as the parents need to keep things in check and not let them go overboard
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:34:02 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
Usually you have to consume something before you can understand how to create. Let's say children read books or watch music videos or play an educational app. Those all could be building blocks (if presented in the right way by the way) to a child then writing her own book, learning to play an instrument, or even designing their own app.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:40:48 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
@Broadway0474

Agreed,

With my own kids, when using educational apps...they think it's a game and they're learning...what's best is that they love it... they constantly request to play those games
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:51:12 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
The best of the educational apps do that ... teach kids skills without them even knowing it. Kind of like Kix cereal (right?) or veggie juice drinks that are loaded with nutrients but taste like fruit juice. The latest kinds of educational apps are using adaptive learning engines that allow kids to play the same game over and over, while it incrementally gets more challenging and presents new skills/problems. Cool stuff.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:06:39 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
@mak63,

At my home we have every single piece of entertainment available (tablets, video games, on demand, PCs, you name it).

But like all in life, we make sure things don't go overboard.

Both my kids love to watch the cartoons they specifically like, so having everything be on demand works really well (no commercials or waiting for a specific time slot for a cartoon).

And the fact that using a tablet is something that's intuitive for them does show that upcoming generations will see technology as a way of life.
jkwalker111
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jkwalker111,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2015 | 10:27:54 AM
Standing Desk
I've had back trouble off and on for years.  Sitting at a desk all day/every day I also started to get puffy ankles & feet - quite distressing at age 50.  I got an Ergotron contraption that supports two monitors, keyboard and mouse and it's helped tremendously.  I suspect that I now stand for about 2/3rds of the time.  The back is much better and the edema has disappeared.  You don't need a $500 adjustable platform, either.  I have a coworker who puts her laptop on a couple of milk crates - viola - a standing desk.  Bottom line - try it out.  Google "Sitting all day kills you".
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 11:12:01 AM
Re: Standing Desk
Even babies are using technology. There has to be a time limit for kids. I also think it is appropriate for people to know when and where is appropritate to use your devices. For example, technology should be off-limits at dinner, at Church, when company is over, etc.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 11:17:20 AM
Re: Standing Desk
The "digital babysitters" really sets the children up for developing difficulties in healthy social skills. I think it hinders kids from going outside to play and socialize with peers outside. The days of red light, green light are far gone. Kids feel more comfortable communicating digitally than they do in person. It hinders kids from learning how to appropriately act in a restaurant without a device in their face.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2015 | 3:17:22 PM
Re: Standing Desk
@angelfuego agreed. It's something I didn't think much about until I started exploring the effects of technology on health, but kids miss so much when they're staring at a screen. Facial expressions, hand gestures, basic social norms won't sink in if all their communication is online.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 11:29:33 AM
Re: Standing Desk
@jkwalker. I wasn't even thinking about the correlation between back pain and technology use, but it makes total sense. I think I will take a break from the computer right now to stretch and takes a short stroll. lol
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 11:35:32 AM
Re: Standing Desk
@Kelly, And we wonder why teachers are getting blamed for not being engaging enough? LOL They are always told that they need to teach the curriculum in a way that engages the students. It is very rough. Look at the competition. Video games, twitter, etc. Kids need to learn to focus and concentrate on the teacher and content being taught. It is a skill that is fading. It boggles my mind as to why Mayor DeBlasio lifted the cell phone ban in schools. These kids were brought up with digital babysitters and are practically addicted to technology. Where will there focus be? School work or cell phone? The students need to be just as accountable as the teachers. Their futures depend on it.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2015 | 3:20:27 PM
Re: Standing Desk
I think implementing technology into a school program is very, very tricky and don't envy the teachers who have to do it. The idea of tech in the classroom puts instructors in a difficult position. Yes, today's kids must be equipped with tech skills in order to get ahead... but how do you make sure they're actually learning and not just talking to their friends or playing games behind the screen?
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:12:51 PM
Re: Standing Desk
@Kelly22,

I share your concern, which is why implementing such programs with a clear guidance of IT experts is critical!

Many programs don't invest in having the right folks monitor and assist with the role out. These will go deep dive into the details and have those filters and checks and balances in place.

Like any IT implementation, defining user roles and access rights is something that's worth the investment.
kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 11:09:45 AM
Technology addiction...really?
Well there another reason not to use facebook. But most of these arguments could be put onto books as well. Sitting and being sedentary are the same with a book in hand or my computer. (With the keyboard my fingers might at least see some exercise), focusing enough to not blink (I doubt I blink more when reading an engrossing book) and even the I don't recall phenomenon, if I have the book right there I might choose to look it up than try to remember.

And calling this technology addiction is a bit absurd. Addiction, is when it impedes the rest of your life, causing loss of relationships, employment and such. Most of the reason many of us use technology is for work, and facebook aside it means we can skype with people far away to improve our relationships. And kids are little more than walking ids and are going to play with the coolest most engrossing toys for as long as we let them, longer it their sneaky. That's not addiction, that being a kid and still learning that you benefit from sleep, doing your homework, and going to visit Grandma.

The only one I can really get behind here is sleep deprivation. When I turn off the tv and computers early and read or do something without all that blue light, I do sleep better.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 11:23:37 AM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
@kstaron, I agree with you about the point you brought up about Skype. I think that out of all the different uses of technology, Skype is really the only one that really promotes social interaction via verbal/oral communication. It doesn't isolate people from others and promotes social interaction and conversation that involves eye contact, speech, and not typed communication.
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2015 | 2:24:20 PM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
I'm positive technology causes a myriad of heath problems. The issue is – what are we supposed to do about it? I have to use a computer, I must be tethered to my smartphone. Maybe this is an issue that can be resolved with ergonomics. 
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2015 | 3:28:24 PM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
@kstaron it's crazy that society has come to this, but I found there are legitimate rehab programs for people who use technology to the point that it starts to interfere with their normal living patterns and place stress on their family and friends. Pennsylvania's Bradford Regional Medical Center, and reSTART in Falls City, WA (ironically, right near Microsoft HQ) are two examples. The condition is especially well-known in parts of Asia (China, Taiwan, South Korea), where it's a more widespread issue.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2015 | 12:12:30 AM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
I didn't realize it was an accepted addiction--does insurance pay for treatment of a tech additction as a behavioral problem?

 
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
6/29/2015 | 9:33:38 AM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
@impactnow it's tricky to say. While it's becoming more accepted, tech addiction isn't technically recognized as a behavioral health disorder so the condition isn't really covered. That said, there are some problems that stem from tech addiction (anxiety, depression, etc.) that are covered by insurance, so I guess your coverage depends on your problem, insurance plan and doctor.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:04:12 PM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
@kelly22,

One aspect worth mentioning is patience and attention span. What i've noticed is that many folks expect things to work instantly, don't take the time to read instructions (since the rather watch a how-to video) and start banging on things when they don't work as they think they should.

But I also see the opposite, folks that they take the time to dive into the details.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
6/30/2015 | 5:18:42 PM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
@mejiac I've noticed this as well! Mostly on the impatience side. People will go nuts if there's a glitch in their PC or their smartphone freezes up - everyone is so used to technology working smoothly that they always expect it.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
7/1/2015 | 1:45:50 PM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
@Kely22,

I think this is why Apple Mac PCs have a good reputation with users since they usually "Just work" and don't provide the headaches related to your conventional PC user (although this is good for tech guys since it brings in more business LOL)
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
7/6/2015 | 6:49:12 AM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
At least I found that my memory does not work so well if I rely too much on electronics. People will prefer to take a photo of the system diagram on whiteboard instead of drawing to notebook by themselves.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
7/6/2015 | 11:18:35 AM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
In school, I used to notice students taking pictures of professors' notes to save the trouble of recording their own. Seemed like a good way to quickly record the homework assignments, but I could never take notes that way. Personally, I remember things best by writing them down... may be old fashioned but it has always worked for me!
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
7/19/2015 | 12:47:09 PM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
I agree.  I think taking notes of the material makes learning process and recall better than taking pictures.  I think this is a great article.  Often times, people aren't aware of the health issues impacting overexposure to technology.  It is something very important to keep in mind.  I had a friend who try to self diagnost by going to google rather than going to the doctor. I really huge mistake.
JediSQL
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JediSQL,
User Rank: Guru
6/25/2015 | 11:39:18 AM
Correlation vs Causation
Social isolation is not caused by Facebook - Facebook is the symptom of social isolation.  Social isolation is caused by two main factors.  1) Law against drunk driving. One of the reasons alcohol is so popular is that it lubricates social interaction. When people cannot get together to drink, then people do not get together.  2) The endless fear mongering of the news, lawyers and governments. We are constantly bombarded with messages to not trust our fellow man. Parents do not allow their children out into the neighborhood to play and learn to interact with their community. Playing video games is all there is for them to do.

Facebook use and decline of happiness: The topic identifies correlation, not causation. It is highly likely that those using Facebook are looking to fill in something missing.

Screen time and weight gain: I read about a study that showed that video gamers on average are thinner than the general population on average.

People should get up and walk around.

Humanity's greatness is not in the memorization of facts. It is in the innovation of ideas based on available information.  When we spend less time researching and memorizing facts, we have more time to be creative, and with more information readily available, we have more resources to be creative with.  "... tweeting... Game of Thrones... might not remember everything..." 1) "might" shows there are no facts, just fear mongering.  2) Less clutter of the trivial in our minds leaves more room for the important.  3) The importance of entertainment is in the enjoyment of the art, not the proving we consumed it.

People have had ergonomics problems before computers.  If the ergonomics of computers become true problems, lawyers will start suing, insurance companies will enforce standards, and we will be OK.

When a student spends 2 to 4 hours a day reading school books, does that not cause pressure on the neck?  Or are they, as Luddite devices, exempt from causing human suffering?

One does need to be careful about loud sounds, but hearing reduction is not usually a cause of death.

Cyberchondria: All change involves chaos. People will learn to better filter the extreme access to information on the Web, and market forces will drive the innovation will lead to Web sites that better direct self-diagnosis.
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State of the Cloud
State of the Cloud
Cloud has drastically changed how IT organizations consume and deploy services in the digital age. This research report will delve into public, private and hybrid cloud adoption trends, with a special focus on infrastructure as a service and its role in the enterprise. Find out the challenges organizations are experiencing, and the technologies and strategies they are using to manage and mitigate those challenges today.
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Data Science and AI in the Fast Lane
This IT Trend Report will help you gain insight into how quickly and dramatically data science is influencing how enterprises are managed and where they will derive business success. Read the report today!
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