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6/24/2015
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Kelly Sheridan
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9 Ways Technology Is Slowly Killing Us All

The cost of technology addiction goes beyond pricey gadgets. Connectivity also affects vision, memory loss, weight gain and self-esteem.
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Blink. Blink Again. 
When staring at a screen for long periods of time, you usually forget to blink. The habit leads to a condition called 'computer vision syndrome,' which leads to dry eyes, fatigue, irritation, headaches, problems focusing, or neck and shoulder pain. Also known as digital eyestrain, it has become more prevalent as people spend more time using electronic devices.
Computer vision syndrome doesn't cause lasting eye damage but it's still important to take necessary precautions. Limit the amount of time you spend in front of a screen and take frequent breaks. Keep some eye drops at your desk in case irritation starts to occur.
(Image: Brandsurfers)

Blink. Blink Again.

When staring at a screen for long periods of time, you usually forget to blink. The habit leads to a condition called "computer vision syndrome," which leads to dry eyes, fatigue, irritation, headaches, problems focusing, or neck and shoulder pain. Also known as digital eyestrain, it has become more prevalent as people spend more time using electronic devices.

Computer vision syndrome doesn't cause lasting eye damage but it's still important to take necessary precautions. Limit the amount of time you spend in front of a screen and take frequent breaks. Keep some eye drops at your desk in case irritation starts to occur.

(Image: Brandsurfers)

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mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:06:39 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
@mak63,

At my home we have every single piece of entertainment available (tablets, video games, on demand, PCs, you name it).

But like all in life, we make sure things don't go overboard.

Both my kids love to watch the cartoons they specifically like, so having everything be on demand works really well (no commercials or waiting for a specific time slot for a cartoon).

And the fact that using a tablet is something that's intuitive for them does show that upcoming generations will see technology as a way of life.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:04:12 PM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
@kelly22,

One aspect worth mentioning is patience and attention span. What i've noticed is that many folks expect things to work instantly, don't take the time to read instructions (since the rather watch a how-to video) and start banging on things when they don't work as they think they should.

But I also see the opposite, folks that they take the time to dive into the details.
mejiac
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50%
mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 3:01:39 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
@Thomas Claburn,

"people are using devices to create rather than to consume or get lost in social media labor."

I think this is key.

My 6 year old loves to watch youtube videos of toy reviews and anything else he's into (Cartoons and Video Games). But as a Geek, I knkow what and what not to expose him (reason why I love Youtube safe filter feature).

My son spending time watching what he likes is ok, but bot me and my wife make sure he doesn't get an overload and we're fully aware of whatever his exposed to.

So far the experience has been positive, but we're well aware that we as the parents need to keep things in check and not let them go overboard
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
6/29/2015 | 7:02:30 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
>Perhaps, we're seeing the next Steve Jobs, Bill Gates or Elon Musk in the making.

That will only happen if people are using devices to create rather than to consume or get lost in social media labor.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2015 | 1:13:05 PM
Re: Positives and negative
But @SunitaT0 - that's why talking/texting and driving is dangerous and illegal in many states!  It isn't safe.  We may try to do it, yes, but we don't do it well.  
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
6/29/2015 | 9:33:38 AM
Re: Technology addiction...really?
@impactnow it's tricky to say. While it's becoming more accepted, tech addiction isn't technically recognized as a behavioral health disorder so the condition isn't really covered. That said, there are some problems that stem from tech addiction (anxiety, depression, etc.) that are covered by insurance, so I guess your coverage depends on your problem, insurance plan and doctor.
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
6/28/2015 | 10:26:33 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
mak63, as a parent who sticks devices in my children's hands when we're out to dinner --- and usually trying to pull it out of their hands at home --- I can say the big determinent with "screen time" is what's on. Mindless games or something that's teaching them their ABCs? A violent, silly cartoon, or something with an educational component?
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
6/27/2015 | 3:32:33 PM
Re: Wow, more fodder for the paranoid
@GAProgrammer "I can asset, from personal observation, that it seems many parents are glad to let the kids play with tablets and phones to keep them quiet."

I have also seen this behavior myself. Specially from young mothers. And I agree, I don't believe it's such a bad thing. Just different toys.

Perhaps, we're seeing the next Steve Jobs, Bill Gates or Elon Musk in the making.
SunitaT0
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50%
SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
6/27/2015 | 12:15:26 PM
Re: Positives and negative
@vnewman2: We all multitask but to a lesser degree. We do it subconsciously. While driving a car you are doing so many activities at once. Suppose you attend to a call. That is plus one activity in itself. 
vnewman2
100%
0%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
6/26/2015 | 3:22:03 PM
Re: Positives and negative
I've read that there are a select few humans who are lucky enough to be able to efficiently multitask in the true sense of the word because of a special exception in the hard-wiring of their brains. The rest of us are fooling ourselves. Some are better than others at switching between tasks effectively, but doing "more than one thing at a time" doesn't allow you to fully process any of them especially if they are content-similar (talking on the phone and writing this post for instance, which I am doing now and so far I've missed half of what this person is saying...)
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