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Authenticated RFID Model Tries To Protect Against Counterfeit Drugs

Texas Instruments and VeriSign, Inc. introduced Wednesday an authenticated radio frequency identification model (RFID), in an effort to secure chain-of-custody control for pharmaceutical markets.
Texas Instruments and VeriSign, Inc. introduced Wednesday an authenticated radio frequency identification model (RFID), in an effort to secure chain-of-custody control for pharmaceutical markets.

To be an enhancement to item-level, real-time product security, the Authenticated RFID model aims to strengthen authentication between the tag and any Authenticated RFID reader, between manufacturer and consumer. The model combines ISO/IEC standard 13.56 MHz RFID and Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) technologies.

The collaboration's integration of PKI and RFID technologies should generate automated data collection, product authentication at various read points along the supply chain, and ultimately facilitate item identification, the companies said.

Ownership of drugs during shipping and storage will be validated through use of standards-based public key technology, data encryption and digital signatures. PKI will be used for third party authentication and the exchange of encrypting information.

The end result, according to TI and VeriSign: Item-level pharmaceutical authentication of its drugs, in real time and off-network. The Authenticated RFID model intends to combine hardware and services to protect both pharmacies and the consumer from counterfeit drugs.

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