Best And Worst Tech Cities For Drivers - InformationWeek

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11/20/2015
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David Wagner
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Best And Worst Tech Cities For Drivers

Your commute, whether it's bumper-to-bumper or a breeze, can play a major role in your work-life balance. It can extend or take away hours from time with family and friends. We count down the top tech cities that have the most and least traffic congestion.
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(Image: Gemma Longman via Wikimedia Commons)

(Image: Gemma Longman via Wikimedia Commons)

Getting stuck in traffic congestion cost American drivers 6.9 billion hours and $160 billion, collectively,  or 42 hours and $960 per commuter last year, according to the 2015 Urban Mobility Scorecard from the Texas A&M Transportation Institute and big data analytics company INRIX.

For those who strive for work-life balance, time spent sitting in gridlock doesn't contribute anything of value to work or life. It's time wasted that can never be gotten back. Even for non-drivers, congestion affects lifestyle and environment. It's not only a big-city problem. The study found urban areas of all sizes are affected.

To show how major tech hubs ranked, we compiled a list of the five tech centers with the most traffic congestion and the five with the least traffic. We also list the cost each commuter pays in lost time and fuel annually due to gridlock in each of those cities, according to the study.

For the purposes of this list, we identified "tech centers" based on a report from 24/7 Wall St., which highlights the metropolitan areas that have the highest percentages of workers employed in tech industries.

[See 12 Questions To Ask Before Accepting An IT Job.]

The Urban Mobility Scorecard's findings were drawn from traffic speed data collected by INRIX on 1.3 million miles of urban streets and highways, along with highway performance data from the Federal Highway Administration.

While this list may not inspire you to pick up and move to an area with fewer traffic issues, it may help in formulating career plans. Combine this with our recent lists of the top paying colleges, the cities where your paycheck goes the farthest, the hottest jobs for 2016, and the job roles with the best work-life balance and you might have the formula for building your optimal career in IT.

Take a look at the data from the 2015 Urban Mobility Scorecard, and tell us what you do to beat the traffic.

David has been writing on business and technology for over 10 years and was most recently Managing Editor at Enterpriseefficiency.com. Before that he was an Assistant Editor at MIT Sloan Management Review, where he covered a wide range of business topics including IT, ... View Full Bio

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David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
11/24/2015 | 4:44:56 PM
Re: Some surprises
@jries921- LA isn't on the list simply because it doesn't qualify as a tech city. We picked the cities from the list of towns wit a large percentage of tech jobs. If we had gone on gross number of tech jobs then it obviously would have been only big cities that all have similar lifestyles. I was trying to show how some tech centers in the world have other lifesty;es readers might want to consider. 

LA, with the movie industry and other big employeers didn't make the list of tech cities. It does have very bad traffic though as I can attest to as I drove through it yesterday. :)
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
11/20/2015 | 5:33:35 PM
Some surprises
While I predcted some of the cities I was shocked NY wasn't on the worst list since traffic is legendary in the city and boroughs. Also surprised we didn't see LA, is it possible that the criteria for being a "tech city" influenced their placement?
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