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10/15/2015
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Gartner: 10 Radical Changes Coming To IT

Gartner's Daryl Plummer paints a convincing picture of a near-term future full of robots, smart machines, machine learning, and changing mobile habits. Here's everything CIOs and IT professionals need to know to be prepared.
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No. 4
By 2018, more than 3 million workers globally will be supervised by a 'roboboss.' 
During his presentation at the Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, Plummer asked an interesting question to help us prepare for this eventuality: 'If you found out your dog was an android, would you still love it?' That seemed plausible to the crowd.
Then he challenged the crowd with another question: 'If you found out your boss was an android, would you still follow her orders?'
Smart bossing is already happening. Amazon uses routing software to give orders to warehouse employees. Automated dispatch and traffic control is, or soon will be, a reality in transportation. Another possibility is that AI trained to understand emotions could actually be better at managing humans than human managers. Human managers sometimes don't adjust to managing different types of people. An AI might prove more flexible and tolerable in the end, though that scenario is a far cry from a robot that can figure out how to deploy human resources in a warehouse. 
(Image: David Wagner)

No. 4

By 2018, more than 3 million workers globally will be supervised by a "roboboss."

During his presentation at the Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, Plummer asked an interesting question to help us prepare for this eventuality: "If you found out your dog was an android, would you still love it?" That seemed plausible to the crowd.

Then he challenged the crowd with another question: "If you found out your boss was an android, would you still follow her orders?"

Smart bossing is already happening. Amazon uses routing software to give orders to warehouse employees. Automated dispatch and traffic control is, or soon will be, a reality in transportation. Another possibility is that AI trained to understand emotions could actually be better at managing humans than human managers. Human managers sometimes don't adjust to managing different types of people. An AI might prove more flexible and tolerable in the end, though that scenario is a far cry from a robot that can figure out how to deploy human resources in a warehouse.

(Image: David Wagner)

5 of 12
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kstaron
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kstaron,
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10/27/2015 | 1:15:59 PM
Health to us all
How secure is the face and/or voice print tech for devices? I remember that fingerprints tech was approximately the equivalent of a 4 digit password. I imagine voice would be better (though I wonder what happens when I have a cold?)

I'm conflicted by the possibilities of companies demanding fitbits for enployees. If they want to encourage healthy behavior, have they given employees a place to walk or exercise, do they encourage 5 minute walk around breaks, are there healthy options for lunch and snacks around? If they want healthy employees, they need to make efforts to help employees  easily get in exercise and eat a balanced diet, get enough sleep and so on. If a company is that invested in my health, then sure bring on the fitbit. If not...not so much.

 
shamika
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shamika,
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10/22/2015 | 4:02:21 AM
Re: Roboboss says to take a walk
@sanel I agree with you. At the same time they are in the habit of having junk food at their desk. They rarely go for their usual breaks. Having junk food has a significant impact on getting cancer.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
10/20/2015 | 8:32:41 AM
Re: Cloud Security Really? Really???
"So why are the pundits pushing the public cloud agenda? Uh, simple money and monitoring... and neither of them benefit you the business consumer. Government and marketing firms get to monitor you and behaviours, and you have the privlege of paying them to do it."

 

I don't know if I want to take it that far but yes money is a big player, if I pay a company for a piece of software then pay a much smaller amount annually for support for the next 10 years then their revenue stream is different than if they can charge me equal amounts over 10 years.  Long term contract holders make a company less money over the long run and the bigger a company gets the more likely it is to move slowly with software adoption so your best customers end up being your worst revenue streams.  As far as security being higher in the public cloud if you cherry pick the scenario it is possible.  I've seen many small companies with no IT staff do some really dumb things that would not have been an issue if they used a reliable public cloud provider.  As the company size grows and their technical savvy grows with them then it is less beneficial from a security standpoint.  Flexibility and lower TCO becomes the more attractive public cloud offering at that point. 
shamika
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shamika,
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10/20/2015 | 1:01:57 AM
Re: Cloud Security Really? Really???
I think there will be considerable impact on human beings with these changes. Especially on their jobs. 
Midnight
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Midnight,
User Rank: Strategist
10/19/2015 | 6:29:13 PM
Cloud Security Really? Really???
Ok, we know the cloud is precompromised with back doors, that is a given. So ANY vague insinuation that the public cloud is more secure than a private cloud reduces the credibility of the speaker to nil. But that's the simple truth.

The other comments regarding humans being the weakest link in security is relatively true, the challenge is how to convince people to take it seriously. I see the issue as being a case of stakeholder ownership. If the investor is the only valued stakeholder in the enterprise and the senior positions are the only ones being compensated (read over paid) for the efforts of the entire staff supporting the profits, then the "it's just a job" mentality rules. If the employees feel no vested interest to put the extra effort in protecting the company they work for then they simply won't do it. Nothing anyone can say will change that. Look at all the BYOD and rogue AP issues that still plague the ecosystem. The same lack of investment recognition is what disconnects the employee from the business allowing them to see the company as "other than me."

So why are the pundits pushing the public cloud agenda? Uh, simple money and monitoring... and neither of them benefit you the business consumer. Government and marketing firms get to monitor you and behaviours, and you have the privlege of paying them to do it.

Remember It Was NOT Always This Way. This is new and the pundits are just gas-lamping you into thinking this is an acceptable new norm. I submit it is not acceptable and truly is dangerous to business, profits, and privacy.

So here is the real conversation as I see it:

If we are to "Own Our Data" and control our personal experience in life, how do we correct the course we are being steered onto? Or is the Idiocracy world (see the movie) the actual desired environment we wish to live in? Is the apathy incurable? It has already been proven the short term quarterly profit goal model is unsustainable whereas the historical long term business model that values all 4 components of business (investor, management, employee and customer) is successful.

This is a disease that must be treated holistically; validate/compensate employees to build vested interest in success thus motivating them to take security seriously, ignore pundits like that idiot who is simply pushing someone elses product/service that you really don't need and (not can) will put your business at risk, and most importantly Own Your Data like the actual gold that it is. Precompromised security is simply that... Compromised.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
10/19/2015 | 10:25:56 AM
Re: Roboboss says to take a walk

@SaneIT    Good point.  We have in many ways already reached the point where AI is doing most of the jobs that are repetitive and thanks for giving some other examples where it would reduce costs - legal fees for instance.

 

AI can and will affect both blue and white collar jobs.

SaneIT
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SaneIT,
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10/19/2015 | 8:21:00 AM
Re: Roboboss says to take a walk
The machines are becoming the stockers too.  Eventually we'll have AI bosses directing robot stock boys and a Jetson's style supervisor watching the console to make sure the AI isn't out of control.  I think there are some industries that we're not discussing much that will be changed dramatically by AI. The legal profession for example.  All the hours spent researching cases?  Put Watson on the job and 100 hours quickly become 1 hour.  I suspect that accounting will be done very much the same, auditing by AI makes a lot of sense especially if you can keep the audit open and running rather than running them periodically. 
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
10/18/2015 | 7:02:53 PM
No. 2
 

Not really a surprise here. All of the gadgets which the IoT is comprised of will need servicing, heck they already do. In the future it will be easy to understand that IT will create support niches for these  needs.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
10/18/2015 | 6:58:52 PM
Re: Roboboss says to take a walk
Some really interesting predictions by Gartner of the future of tech and I do agree that most of it will be AI based.  

Machines actually becoming the boss in many cases ?   Well, one can see in retail at least already,  that the worker has become just a stocker.  What this will mean for other industries is  interesting to contemplate.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
10/16/2015 | 12:09:32 PM
Re: Roboboss says to take a walk
@SaneIT- I mostly agree with you (and me). But is just amazing what a company will do, and how they can get around some loopholes, in the name of saving a few bucks.
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