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IT Midlife Crisis

Change overshadows the IT profession, especially in the United States.
IT Midlife Crisis
Change overshadows the IT profession, especially in the United States. Skills in demand don't fit everyone's resumé. But the IT career isn't dead. It's just suffering a midlife crisis, according to Forrester Research data from interviews with 53 IT executives. Numbers on this page, unless otherwise noted, come from that survey or Forrester projections.

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28
percent will most likely downsize IT in the next two years
2004
IT budget and salary spending grew 5%

2005
IT budget and salary spending will grow 7%

Staff-related spending alone will grow 6%

Last year, only 1.4% of incoming freshmen picked computer science as their major Five years ago, computer-science majors accounted for 3.7% of incoming freshmen
SEVENTY-TWO
percent of IT jobs are in businesses with 99 or fewer people
--Information Technology Association of America

skills
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S
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--> Twenty-five percent say 55% of staffing needs are outsourced

--> Thirty-six percent plan to increase IT outsourcing

--> One in five report 25% to 50% of staff is outsourced

Twenty-five percent anticipate a shortage of skills in the next two years
It skills expected to be the most difficult to obtain or retain IT skills that will be most in demand
> I.T Architects > Strategists
> Programmers > Business Analysts
> Security Experts > Project and Program Managers