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Kill Bill's Browser Site Aims To Cash In On Google's Bounty

Four political activists from Massachusetts launched a parody Web site Wednesday dubbed "Kill Bill's Browser" to convince Web users to switch from Internet Explorer to Firefox.
Four political activists from Massachusetts launched a parody Web site Wednesday dubbed "Kill Bill's Browser" to convince Web users to switch from Internet Explorer to Firefox.

Along the way, they just may make themselves a few bucks by getting people to change browsers.

With a color scheme reminiscent of Quentin Tarantino's "Kill Bill" films, the site features "13 Good Reasons to Switch from Internet Explorer to Firefox." Number 7? "It will make Bill Gates soooooooooo mad." Number 11? "Reduce your weekly family & friends tech support load to 8 hours."

But according to one of the quartet behind the site -- who are also behind ExplorerDestroyer.com, which offers free scripts that Web site owners can use to entice converts -- the parody is serious business.

"We think there's a huge opportunity for anyone who's creative to make a good case why people should switch to Firefox, and make money at the same time," said Holmes Wilson.

"If we got a ton of traffic, we can make a dollar per person the same as anyone else," he added. "But we really did it to showcase how anyone can do this."

Holmes, and his partners -- Nick Nassar, Tiffiniy Cheng, and Nicholas Reville, all of Worcester, Mass. -- are taking advantage of a new Google affiliate program called Adsense Referrals. The new plan, which debuted to virtually no fanfare Tuesday, pays Web site operators $1 for each user they refer who downloads and runs a copy of Firefox.

"This is amazing, a bounty of $1 on the head of each IE user," said Holmes, like his colleagues, a long-time Firefox user. "It's a story that could fly under the radar. Google's literally setting the stage for a gold rush around convincing people to switch from Microsoft."

While Holmes and the others have been fans of Firefox's community marketing site, SpreadFirefox.com -- "It really raised the bar for organizing people online," said Holmes -- Kill Bill's Browser and ExplorerDestroyer are their first real efforts in Firefox proselytizing.

On ExplorerDestroyer.com, the four posted a letter explaining why they created the site.

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