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LCD Television Shipments Surpass CRTs For First Time

LCD TV shipments increased 56% year over year, to more than 28.5 million units, or 47% of the global television market, according to DisplaySearch.
Shipments of liquid-crystal display television sets outnumbered conventional picture tube TV sets for the first time in fourth quarter of 2007, according to figures released Tuesday.

DisplaySearch, a market research and consulting company, reported that worldwide television shipments grew 21% in the quarter over the previous quarter and 5% year over year. Shipments totaled nearly 200 million units in 2007 and revenues surpassed $100 billion for the first time, according to DisplaySearch. Revenue increased 10% year over year and 26% from 3Q to 4Q, when revenue grew to a record $32.9 billion, the company said.

LCD TV shipments increased 56% year over year, to more than 28.5 million units, or 47% of the global television market, compared to 46% for CRT TVs, according to DisplaySearch. From 3Q to 4Q, they rose 41%. Total LCD TV shipments in 2007 reached 79.3 million units, up 73% from 2006.

LCD TV revenue grew 34% year over year and 31% from 3Q to 4Q, bringing in $22.8 billion in 4Q and nearly $68 billion for the year. That's up 40% from 2006.

The average LCD screen size surpassed 32 inches for the first time in 4Q, while screens 40 inches and up accounted for 25% of the units sold and 44% of the revenue in 2007. In 2006, they accounted for 17% of the units sold and 33% of the revenue.

Western Europe overtook North America for the market share lead in LCD TV shipments at 32%, compared to North America's 31%.

On a brand share basis, Sony leapt ahead of Samsung for the top slot in LCD revenue shares (19.5%), but Samsung retained its lead for units sold.

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