informa
/
1 MIN READ
News

LG.Philips LCD Introduces Color E-Paper Display

The 14.1-inch display is thin, flexible, and comparable in quality to printed pages, according to the company.
LG.Philips LCD has introduced a 14.1-inch color e-paper display, a followup to the black-and-white version it released in May 2006.

The new product, which uses electronic ink from E-Ink, can produce a maximum of 4,096 colors and can be viewed from a full 180 degrees without any degradation in picture quality. The display can be bent almost in half, without affecting the image.

Like the black-and-white version, the color liquid crystal display uses a substrate that arranges thin-film transistors on metal foil rather than glass, giving the e-paper its flexibility. The latest model includes a color filter coated onto the plastic substrate.

The displays are extremely energy efficient, because they only use power when the images change. The device is very thin, less than 300 micrometers, and shows pictures comparable in quality to printed pages, the South Korean company said.

"LG.Philips LCD is the first company to develop a flexible color e-paper display of this size," In-Jae Chung, the company's chief technology officer and executive VP, said in a statement released Sunday. "The potential applications for this display are incredible and will allow our customers to create new products that are not only convenient to use, but also save natural resources."

The company didn't list any manufacturers that plan to use the new display. LG.Philips first introduced a 10.1-inch e-paper display in October 2005.

LG.Philips isn't the only company developing e-paper. Prime View International, based in Taiwan, recently introduced Vizplex, which also uses E-Ink technology. Vizplex, scheduled for release in the summer, ranges in sizes from 1.9 inches to 9.7 inches. The device is expected to be used in handheld devices, including digital music players, computer peripherals, and electronic books.

This article was edited on May 17 to clarify the debut of black-and-white e-paper