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New Version Of SQL Server CE Database

The database lets users of Microsoft's Pocket PC and Windows CE-based devices search and manipulate data online or off.
Microsoft and others have a mission: Make it easier to develop and support mobile apps. Microsoft has introduced a new version of its SQL Server CE database for mobile devices and accompanying developer tools.

The database lets users of Microsoft's Pocket PC and Windows CE-based devices search and manipulate data online or off. It also has wizards to ease the setup of security and connectivity options for data replication and an improved storage engine that supports the same number of indexes per table (249) as SQL Server. Software for the server-side of SQL server will run on SQL Server CE 2, speeding the time to market for mobile apps. Microsoft also released a second beta edition of its .Net Compact Framework and Visual Studio .Net. Both are designed to make it easier for programmers to develop mobile applications for .Net, Microsoft's implementation of Web services.

Several developers say they'll use the new tools to create mobile .Net apps. FlyteComm Corp. plans to create software that will make it easier to write programs that send real-time flight-status information to mobile devices. "Travelers today are desperate for accurate information that will make their trip easier," says Maurice Bailey, CEO of FlyteComm. Agilent Technologies, Computer Associates, GeoComm Systems, and Vertigo Software say they'll use .Net Compact Framework or SQL Server 2, as well.

Net6 Inc. plans to unveil hardware to ease mobile-app development. Last week, the vendor unveiled Mobile Transformation Gateway, a network-based appliance, starting at $8,000, that takes application content and renders it in real time to work on different devices. That makes life easier for developers, since they don't have to worry about the platform or device on which their content will be displayed.

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