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New York Times Drinks The bMighty Kool-Aid

Last week, the New York Times discovered what bMighty readers have known for a long time: Small Is The New Large.
Last week, the New York Times discovered what bMighty readers have known for a long time: Small Is The New Large.Busy making lemonade, the Times' Paul B. Brown writes that A Business Forced to Shrink May Be Stronger.

The idea, according to Brown, is that businesses can get too big, and in many cases smaller companies can do a better job. Quoting various bloggers, Brown lays out the advantages:

  • Less bureaucracy.
  • Greater engagement.
  • Easier for people to understand where they fit in.
  • People believe it is their company.
  • Easier risk-taking.
  • Fewer clients, more money.
  • Founder handles more of the customer interactions.
  • Outsource the boring, low-impact stuff.
  • Flexibility to change the business model when needed.
  • Less impact on the environment.

Great stuff. Couldn't agree more. In fact, I seem to recall that the bMighty Manifesto made the point quite eloquently when we relaunched the site late last summer. What did we call it again? Ahh, that's right, Small Is The New Large.

Of course, we concentrated on the technological advantages, such as:

  • Taking advantage of cloud computing.
  • Leveraging Software as a Service (SaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS).
  • Embracing the consumerization of IT.
  • Easier to move into Web 2.0, Social Networking, User-Generated Content.
  • Ability to use Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and Search-Based Marketing (SEM).

So, to the New York Times, we say: "Welcome to the party."

Editor's Choice
Sara Peters, Editor-in-Chief, InformationWeek / Network Computing
John Edwards, Technology Journalist & Author
John Edwards, Technology Journalist & Author
James M. Connolly, Contributing Editor and Writer