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Personal Tech: The iPod, for all its fame, is rendered powerless by the car stereo. There are plenty of accessories to resolve this problem. One of them, the $60 Macally FMCup, sits in a car's cup holder and docks and charges your iPod while it plays thro

Suunto's G6 golfing watch won't just get you to your tee time on time; it'll also help you achieve a more consistent swing by delivering instantaneous real-time swing analysis; Camera phones may take pictures, but most don't let you attach snippets of audio. Sony's new $400 ICD-CX50 comes in handy for dictation, class lectures, even shopping for a new home.
Nintendo DS Lite handheld game playerDS Lite Arrives Stateside
Just in time for summer vacation, Nintendo has started selling its $130 DS Lite handheld game player in the United States. The new version is two-thirds the size and weighs 20% less than the original Nintendo DS. DS Lite's two screens can be adjusted to four brightness levels, which can extend batteries up to 19 hours. No need to buy new games, either; Lite plays more than 100 existing titles.



iPod Macally FMCupRev Up Your iPod
The iPod, for all its fame, is rendered powerless by the car stereo. There are plenty of accessories to resolve this problem. One of them, the $60 Macally FMCup, sits in a car's cup holder and docks and charges your iPod while it plays through the FM stereo receiver. Three docks fit different size iPods (as well as other MP3 players with a 3.5-mm headphone jack). The FMCup is powered through the cigarette lighter adapter.



Suunto's G6 golfing watchDuffer's Delight
Suunto's G6 golfing watch won't just get you to your tee time on time; it'll also help you achieve a more consistent swing by delivering instantaneous real-time swing analysis. Acceleration sensors on the $400 G6 measure the movement of your wrist during a swing. After you hit the ball, the watch uses the data collected by these sensors to provide information on three critical elements: tempo, rhythm, and the length and speed of your backswing.



HP Photosmart R927Photographer's Friend
Forget megapixel counts and zoom strength, the only way now to tell digital cameras apart is by their unique features. HP has decided to give you less, literally. A "slimming"effect on its $400 Photosmart R927 lets you add borders and slightly scrunch subjects, making them look thinner. If that doesn't grab your attention, the 3-inch color display surely will. The R927 has basic features, too. The metal-bodied camera boasts 8.2 megapixels of photo power, 3x optical zoom, and 8x digital zoom. The included dock lets you transfer photos to your PC or printer while recharging the camera's battery, and 32 Mbytes of internal memory gives you plenty of storage.



Sony ICD-CX50 digital voice recorder and 1.2-megapixel cameraSight And Sound
Camera phones may take pictures, but most don't let you attach snippets of audio. Sony's new $400 ICD-CX50 comes in handy for dictation, class lectures, even shopping for a new home. The combination digital voice recorder and 1.2-megapixel camera with 4x digital zoom packs 256 Mbytes of memory, a 1.2-inch color LCD screen, and a rechargeable battery. It's also USB 2.0 compatible. The ICD-CX50 features a built-in playback speaker and stereo microphone and an external microphone jack. Sony's digital Voice-Up function increases the volume of the person speaking when recorded at a distance from the unit while maintaining overall quality.



Shure E4c budsKeep Your Ears Happy
How big a difference can high-quality earbuds make? A gigantic one. Shure's E4c buds are state of the art. Two new features make them even more appealing than Shure's previous E3c model: outstanding bass response and a noise-blocking feature that manages to cancel out a great deal of outside noise. Above and beyond the audio quality, these buds, priced between $200 and $300, are extremely comfortable. And because ears come in all shapes and sizes, Shure provides several flexible foam sleeves for a customized fit.



Garmin's newest GPS-capable cycle computerPedal Pusher
Recreational and serious cyclists alike will find lots of interesting--and even some useful--features in Garmin's newest GPS-capable cycle computer. The core feature of the Edge 305 is a waterproof GPS receiver that's sensitive enough to pinpoint your position even in canyons and among trees. The $379 device also offers a heart-rate monitor, wireless pedaling and cadence measurements, speedometer, odometer, and even an altimeter. Installation's a breeze; simply snap the bike mount on your handlebars, attach the computer to the mount, and you're off.



Flexibility Is Key
Adesso's new line of keyboards is flexible for just about any environment and won't stretch your wallet. The full-size and miniature USB rubber keyboards run around $30 and are made of silicon-based rubber with flexible circuitry inside. The keyboards are water- and contaminant-resistant, and they come with a USB-to-PS/2 adapter for use with systems that lack USB ports. The flexible material provides tactile feedback and remains virtually silent as users press the keys. What's more, the keyboards are slim and lightweight. They can be folded or rolled up to fit into a jacket pocket or the accessory pouch of a travel bag.

Editor's Choice
Brian T. Horowitz, Contributing Reporter
Samuel Greengard, Contributing Reporter
Nathan Eddy, Freelance Writer
Brandon Taylor, Digital Editorial Program Manager
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek
Sara Peters, Editor-in-Chief, InformationWeek / Network Computing