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Preliminary Survey Results: Enterprise 2.0 Adoption

The BrainYard - Where collaborative minds congregate.
The way to survive - and flourish - in a tough economy is to be smarter, faster and leaner than your competition. Now is the time to explore and expand Enterprise 2.0 adoption in your organization.We presented a community survey to crowdsource answers on Enterprise 2.0 Adoption in your company. Here are some key findings from our preliminary results:
  • 98% of those surveyed are using Enterprise 2.0 technologies for internal communication and collaboration within their company. The most popular technologies used are instant messaging (74%), wikis and team workspaces (67%), and blogs (51%).
  • Despite, or perhaps because of, the economic downturn, the majority of respondents say their spending on Enterprise 2.0 will increase (58%) in 2009.
  • Most respondents (64%) say that adoption of Enterprise 2.0 is company-wide. Although this trend is stronger at smaller companies, it seems large scale implementations are taking place
  • The number one barrier to adopting Enterprise 2.0 is cultural: resistance to change (53%). Other challenges include difficulty in measuring ROI (43%), integrating with existing technologies (37%), and security concerns (31%).
Learn how to address these challenges at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference with keynotes and conference sessions on building collaborative business cultures, choosing the right technologies, and tackling security issues. Register with code CNACEB08 for 20% off a conference or workshop pass, or to receive your free Pavilion Pass.* The survey was distributed via email to our industry lists. There were a total of 157 survey respondents as of this blog post. We will update our data as we get more results.
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