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Startup Develops Holographic Storage Media

Israeli startup company Matteris Ltd. is developing a removable holographic data storage system for the enterprise archive and backup market.
HAIFA, Israel — Israeli startup company Matteris Ltd. is developing a removable holographic data storage system for the enterprise archive and backup market.

The company is working on holographic media and a recording/reading driver circuitry and predicts that CD-ROM sized media can store terabytes instead of a maximum of 27-Gbytes, as in Sony’s blu-ray DVD.

Along side these large capacities, there is a need of higher speed data transfer. By writing in parallel millions of bits grouped in individual holograms — a hologram is a picture of 1000 by 1000 bits each — every millisecond, the system reaching gigabit per second writing/reading speeds.

The company’s development is based on materials which it claimed are superior to photopolymers, offering no need for development, no shrinkage, no reading between recording sessions, daylight safety, and higher capacity.

Matteris has said it would focus initially on the enterprise archiving and backup systems market, and then on the high capacity-high transfer speed drivers and media into the consumer market for HDTV recorders/players, video on demand, portable digital video cameras and game consoles.

One of the best known holographic storage developers is InPhase Technologies Inc. (Longmont, Colo.), a five-year old startup company that claimed to have recorded the highest data density of any commercial technology by recording 515 gigabits of data per square inch using its Tapestry system.

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