Tesla Model 3, BMW i3: 10 Electric Vehicles To Own - InformationWeek
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4/4/2016
07:05 AM
Nathan Eddy
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Tesla Model 3, BMW i3: 10 Electric Vehicles To Own

On March 31, Tesla Motors unveiled its Model 3, one of the most hotly anticipated electric cars in what is becoming a burgeoning market. Tesla is not alone. BMW, Chevy, Ford, and others are looking to change how the world moves. Here's a look at the best electric vehicles on the market.
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(Image: Tesla)

(Image: Tesla)

The burgeoning electric vehicle market got a high-profile boost last week with the unveiling of Tesla Motor's Model 3, the company's first vehicle aimed at a mass-market audience. Its consumer-friendly price of just $35,000 falls far below those of Tesla's luxury Model X and Model S vehicles.

Even though Tesla is grabbing a lot of press from the March 31 announcement, Elon Musk's company is far from the only player in the all-electric market space.

While consumers may not be able to purchase all-electric vehicles everywhere in the US -- though almost all models listed here are available in several East Coast and West Coast states -- there are certainly plenty of makes and models to suit a variety of needs and tastes.

While most of the cars featured here fall into the more affordable range, InformationWeek has also included a few select vehicles from BMW, which offers more of the luxury and performance features that the higher-end Teslas also boast.

The desire for electric cars, whether it's a luxury brand or a more affordable one, is only beginning.

[There's a race on for electric vehicle talent. Here's what Apple, Tesla, and others are up to.]

The global electric vehicles market is projected to hit $271.67 billion in revenue by 2019. In terms of volume sales, the market is predicted to trade 64.4 million units of electric vehicles by the end of the forecast period, according to a September 2015 report from Transparency Market Research (TMR)(paywall).

With all this in mind, InformationWeek has put together a list of nine all-electrics, plus one hybrid electric, to give our readers a sense of what's currently on the market, how far they'll take you, and, of course, what they look like.

You may not be in the market for an electric car yet, but you'll be surprised by how many options you have to choose from.

Nathan Eddy is a freelance writer for InformationWeek. He has written for Popular Mechanics, Sales & Marketing Management Magazine, FierceMarkets, and CRN, among others. In 2012 he made his first documentary film, The Absent Column. He currently lives in Berlin. View Full Bio

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thurlbut070
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thurlbut070,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2016 | 1:56:55 PM
Re: When charging takes no longer than gassing up
I'm sure your home charger and your charging plan at work have you covered as to your commuting range. The range to other destinations--grocery shopping, mail drop, visiting, and so forth--would concern me more were I in your place. And lately I've had to make a few trips for 350 miles each way. The Tesla Model 3 could make it--with one visit to a Tesla Model 3/S supercharger along the way, plus one slow or fast charge at destination, especially when preparing for the return leg.

You raise an interesting point. Will the last gas(p) of internal combustion see the relegation of gasoline (or Diesel) cars to rental and long-haul freight fleets? Will the railroads take back the long-haul freight market they lost to the truckers? Will all shopping go to home delivery and on-line ordering? That might seem a different area for speculation. But already we see internal-combustion cars extending their range to 500 miles, or 600, with good driving habits. So I suspect the only thing that will kill internal combustion, will be legislation, or a new theory of individual/joint/several liability for local air pollution.
kkinnison
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kkinnison,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2016 | 1:42:08 PM
Re: When charging takes no longer than gassing up
In other words, if you move a couch once a month does it make sense to own a pickup year round? Or rent a flat from home depot for the one hour? If you are doing daily amounts of 80+ though, yeah I'd stick to gas.
kkinnison
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kkinnison,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2016 | 1:39:27 PM
Re: When charging takes no longer than gassing up
I lease the Kia myself. Thing is it is a different use set- I almost never charge away from home or work. If a do I've located the fast chargers in my area but in general you don't want to use them since they cost more than home charging. (My employer has a generous charging plan). We've very rarely found this very limiting. We still have a second gas car, but it actually gets driven less. But I also realize my driving habits aren't everyone's', I'd wager they're pretty typical. I commute daily from a suburb to downtown, with occasional weekend trips. If I didn't have the second gas car is probably look to renting or borrowing. Or look at something with a gas extender like the volt.
thurlbut070
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thurlbut070,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/5/2016 | 9:55:39 AM
When charging takes no longer than gassing up
Tesla has "lapped" the competition many times over with its Supercharging stations. They built those originally for the Model S, but the new Model 3 can use them, too. You can navigate to one using the car's on-board navigation system. The key: charging takes minutes instead of hours. I'd be interested in anyone having experience with the Model S or Model 3, and whether the supercharger does everything Tesla says it will do. If so, Tesla has broken through to the next level.

But now they should add the regenerative (dynamic) braking Kia offers in their signature model. Even a lightweight car not carrying a full load will waste a lot of energy as heat during braking. Recapturing that energy will extend its range and save a lot of wear and tear.

The rest of the "no-emissions" solution: how to generate the power.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
4/4/2016 | 7:39:55 AM
Range is still important
Although there's a number of electric cars on this list I might not mind owning, I think the Tesla cars still top my list. That Focus looks really nice, but a 76 mile range is not going to win it much support I don't think. Even if there are charge stations all over - which there aren't just yet - that's still way too regular a recharge to make it as smooth as traditional car driving - which is what EV needs to emulate to succeed.
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