informa
/
Commentary

There's Plenty Of Open Source Documentation

One of the common complaints about open-source software is that there isn't enough documentation. Actually, there's sufficient documentation, you just have to know where to find it
One of the common complaints about open-source software is that there isn't enough documentation. Actually, there's sufficient documentation, you just have to know where to find it. Today we take you on a quick tour of some of the best Linux and open source resources on the web.

Please put your tray tables up and your seats in their fully upright positions.

  • IBM's Linux Technology Center. I haven't read all of these, but there is a wealth of information here whether you're an admin, a developer, or a beginner. Don't miss the nearly hidden link that takes you to the second half of the alphabet.

  • If you're just starting out, try the Linux FAQ

  • If you're interested in Linux for enterprises then this site is for you.

  • Looking for information about features or how to do a specific task on Linux? Try the Linux Documentation Project

  • If you are looking for a specific open source project, Freshmeat.net and SourceForge.net are the places for you. The sites do not enforce documentation rules of any kind, so groups vary wildly in how much they offer you.

  • If you are concerned about securing your Linux boxes, then LinuxSecurity.com is a great place to start.

  • In addition, check with your software vendor. Most vendors that support open source operating systems supply documentation. Oracle, IBM, Sun, Borland, Novell -- all of these vendors and many more have documents that help you configure your open source applications.

    Don't fall for the "there is no documentation" line. It's out there, and so are newsgroups and mailing lists to support you.