Tinder For Tech Jobs: 5 Apps Better Than LinkedIn - InformationWeek
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2/10/2015
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Tinder For Tech Jobs: 5 Apps Better Than LinkedIn

These five innovative job search apps take advantage of dating-site functionality to help you find your next job while easing the pain of potential rejection.
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(Image source: Philip Absolon via Wikimedia Commons)

(Image source: Philip Absolon via Wikimedia Commons)

Job searching is such a hassle. In fact, if you're already working and you're looking for a better position, you almost feel like you have to quit your job in order to search for a new one.

By the time you're done combing LinkedIn and other places for all the jobs out there, picking the ones you like, writing perfect personalized cover letters, sending a resume that highlights your fit for the particular job, and putting it all into their specialized HR software so they can file you away, you don't even want the job anymore.

There are five new job-hunting services out there that are designed to help make your job search a little easier, especially if you're trying to do it on the sly. In fact, some job apps are actually calling themselves "Tinder for Jobs."

Each one tries to eliminate one or more of those hassles of a traditional LinkedIn job search. They also have one more thing in common: They're trying to take the worst part out of the job search—the rejection.

Rejection is one of the worst things about the job search, especially for people without a job. You get all excited about a position you see advertised and think you are a perfect fit. You go through all the paperwork, the daydreaming, and the wishing and get yourself all geeked up for the job. Then you're rejected before you even get an interview. Or, worse yet, you never hear a peep, and you have no idea if they even read your resume.

The latest trend in job search is almost like a casual date for coffee. You don't have to get really dressed up. You don't work that hard at it. And, if you hit it off, then you go through the real thing. If you don't, no hard feelings and you move on. In some cases, it is more like speed dating: 30 seconds of chat to see whether or not there's a connection.

That's where the Tinder for jobs idea comes in. Tinder is a casual dating app. You look through profiles of potential dates near you. You swipe an arrow if you are interested. Other people are doing the same thing. If you both say you are interested, bam! You get contact info, and you can go on a date.

Some of these job hunting sites are a little more subtle or in-depth than Tinder, but every one of them is trying to do basically the same thing: Eliminate the barriers between the employee and the recruiter.

For the most part, I think that's a good thing, though I wonder if a casual hook-up is the best way to start a job relationship. If all I need to do is swipe right to demonstrate interest in a job, how interested am I really? As a manager, how much can I get to know about an employee from what is essentially a dating profile?

Granted, that's what the interview process is for. But, by taking out those crucial early steps, you might find you make it to the altar with an employee you don't really know as well as you think you do, and end up hiring one who isn't really as committed to the relationship as you think. In fact, someone might be swiping right again the first day on the new job.

Check out these five relatively new job services and see what you think. Then tell us in the comments section below how you landed your last job, and whether you'd use these services for your next one.

David has been writing on business and technology for over 10 years and was most recently Managing Editor at Enterpriseefficiency.com. Before that he was an Assistant Editor at MIT Sloan Management Review, where he covered a wide range of business topics including IT, ... View Full Bio

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Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
3/1/2015 | 11:53:06 AM
Re: Tinder For Tech
@David that's true.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
2/27/2015 | 11:12:41 PM
Re: Not sure
@kstaron- I see how they can be degrading if you took them too seriously. I think they work best for the casual job seeker or the one who is interested in exploring options. You are right, the ten minute conversation seems to be the best use.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
2/27/2015 | 11:10:58 PM
Re: Tinder For Tech
@ariella- Yes, there's nothing worse than not having a certain box checked when you could have checked it. One of the interesting things about these apps is they seem to preclude some of that. You aren't goign to have to tick off all 30 of the right keywords to get seen. On the other hand, it means HR might make even less good decisions with less information.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
2/27/2015 | 11:09:14 PM
Re: Tinder For Tech
@dbrisco863- I suspect you are right. any app is only as good as who uses it. I suspect HR will mostly run it as that is the habit of all larger enterprises. But I suspect in smaller, more agile firms, you might see more managers using it which would be good.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
2/27/2015 | 11:07:32 PM
Re: jobs as disposable as a hookup relationship
@anthonydpaul- Well, you can say it is one step closer to treating them that way or you can say it is an acknowledgment of what is already there. Maybe we're already there and if we are, maybe it is better to make it easier to just treat each other that way. I feel like anything that allows an employee to treat an employer as they are treated is better than keeping them powerless.
kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 12:12:01 PM
Not sure
I'm not sure how I feel about this new type of job search. Like speed dating it feels a little degrading. However, a casual relationship with a company you are interested can pay dividends. The first science job I had wasn't advertised. I heard about it from an employer I was talking to about getting into the field who knew a guy that used his service that was looking for someone to help out with his research. If I think of these job sites more like that, the possibility of learning more about a particular company or job title, there may be more benefit in them and who knows where a ten minute talk might lead?
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
2/11/2015 | 3:40:06 PM
Re: Tinder For Tech
@dbrisco863 I couldn't agree more! HR people do filter out a lot of candidates based on just looking at particular acronyms and names of products they don't have any actual understanding of. You didn't put that particular software directly on your resume, HR will block you from the next step. That is the way to assure that people who may be very adept at picking up whatever is needed will never get a chance to be seen by someone technical enough to understand and appreciate their strengths and experience.
dbrisco863
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dbrisco863,
User Rank: Strategist
2/11/2015 | 12:52:38 PM
Tinder For Tech
The biggest problem in the current hiring process is that most resumes are filtered out by HR before the people actually doing the hiring get to see them. This pr-filtering at times may exclude the best candidate for a job. HR is usually given a list of criteria for applicant compliance but they often do not have the expertise in the specific field to determine that a particular application should get further review even though it is tagged as non-compliant conatins a flag that identifies it for elimination early in the process. If these apps are being used by the person actually needing the position filled it provide the suggested connection between applicant and who they would actualy be working for. That alone would make it worthwhile. If it becomes just another way to prefilter by the HR staff then it is a dis-service.
anthonydpaul
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anthonydpaul,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/11/2015 | 9:37:46 AM
jobs as disposable as a hookup relationship
This concept seems like one more step toward companies treating employees as disposable parts and employees reciprocating by never trusting their employer, always passively hunting for a new backup job before being fired for non-committal.
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