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U.S. Needs To Regain Top Tech Innovation Spot

The emergence of tech-heavy economies in Asia that threaten U.S. dominance in tech innovation is expected to affect the administration's IT priorities.
The emergence of tech-heavy economies in Asia that threaten U.S. dominance in tech innovation is expected to affect the administration's IT priorities.

The focus needs to be on creating policy that strengthens long-term U.S. leadership in science and technology innovation, says Paul Taylor, chief strategy officer at the Center for Digital Government, a technology research group that focuses on the public sector. This should include tax incentives, funding, and an immigration policy resulting in more doctorates in a wide range of forward-looking professions. "India did," Taylor says. "We need to do it."

Federal research and development funding, crucial to encouraging the creation of innovative technologies, has increased 44% since 2001, says Phillip Bond, the Commerce Department's undersecretary for technology. The administration contributes $2 billion annually to networking and IT R&D at the Commerce Department's National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Science Foundation, and the Defense Department. The Bush administration has allocated $1 billion for the development of nanotechnology and has also taken an interest in quantum communication, an emerging encryption system, as well as in squeezing greater performance out of silicon-based technology.

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