Japan Hopes IT Investment, Private Cloud Will Spur Economic Recovery - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
IT Leadership // IT Strategy
News
5/15/2009
03:12 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Japan Hopes IT Investment, Private Cloud Will Spur Economic Recovery

The Kasumigaseki Cloud is part of a larger government project that's expected to create 300,000 to 400,000 new jobs within three years.

While the U.S. government is just beginning to dip its toes into cloud computing, Japan's government is already embarking on ambitious plans to build out a private cloud environment that could eventually host all Japanese government software.

Japan's cloud, dubbed the Kasumigaseki Cloud, is part of a larger government project called the Digital Japan Creation Project that aims to help spur economic recovery in Japan with aggressive IT investment.

That larger project aims to generate tens of billions of dollars worth of new IT market revenue and create 300,000 to 400,000 new jobs within three years. It will also more than double the size of the IT market in Japan by 2020 by investing in research and development of promising new technologies, increasing support of IT education, encouraging green IT, building more ubiquitous broadband links, and taking other steps, including the creation of Japan's mega-private cloud.

"Accelerating the use of [communications and technology] nationwide will require the government to take the initiative in implementing measures," the Japanese government said in a document outlining the Digital Japan Creation Project.

The Kasumigaseki Cloud will be deployed in stages through 2015 and aims to cut development and operating costs while also improving performance. The cloud will require Japan to create new platforms for shared services and consolidate hardware, including the possible building of new data centers. The document is short on details, but other potential benefits of the Kasumigaseki Cloud will include decreased operating costs through the use of only required resources and by making the maintenance and management of individual systems unnecessary.

The new data center or centers being built to support the Kasumigaseki Cloud also will use green technology to help cut costs. The document says the data centers will be built in cold regions, will use wind and solar power, will run on DC power, and may be placed underground where temperatures are stable.


InformationWeek has published an in-depth report on cloud storage. Download the report here (registration required).

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Commentary
What Becomes of CFOs During Digital Transformation?
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  2/4/2020
News
Fighting the Coronavirus with Analytics and GIS
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  2/3/2020
Slideshows
IT Careers: 10 Job Skills in High Demand This Year
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  2/3/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
IT 2020: A Look Ahead
Are you ready for the critical changes that will occur in 2020? We've compiled editor insights from the best of our network (Dark Reading, Data Center Knowledge, InformationWeek, ITPro Today and Network Computing) to deliver to you a look at the trends, technologies, and threats that are emerging in the coming year. Download it today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll