Large Hadron Collider Breaks Energy Record - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
Cloud // Cloud Storage
News
11/30/2009
04:07 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Large Hadron Collider Breaks Energy Record

The physics community is excited to see CERN's particle accelerator up and running again.

Early Monday morning, the problem-plagued Large Hadron Collider (LHC) set a world record in Switzerland when it accelerated twin proton beams to an energy of 1.18 TeV (teraelectronvolts), surpassing the record of 0.98 TeV set in 2001 by the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Tevatron collider in the U.S.

The LHC, a particle accelerator used to study small particles for advanced physics research, is operated by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).

The LHC began operation in September 10, 2008, only to be shut down nine days later following a breakdown caused by a faulty electrical connection between two of the accelerator's massive magnets.

The accelerator's planned restart in 2009 was delayed when two vacuum leaks were found in July.

In November, a piece of baguette dropped by a bird led to a temperature spike in the collider's machinery, but the incident did not delay the LHC's restart earlier this month.

CERN's accelerators and technology director Steve Myers praised the LHC's performance. "I was here 20 years ago when we switched on CERN's last major particle accelerator, LEP," he said in a statement. "I thought that was a great machine to operate, but this is something else. What took us days or weeks with LEP, we're doing in hours with the LHC. So far, it all augurs well for a great research program."

Next year, the LHC will fire even more energetic beams -- 3.5 TeV per beam, colliding with an engery of 7 TeV -- in order to generate proton collision data that's more useful. Today's test aims to make sure that higher intensity experiments can be handled safely.

The LHC is expected to generate about 15 petabytes of scientific data annually, enough to fill over 1.7 million dual-layer DVDs.

To distribute, store, and analyze this data, CERN oversees the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), a network that coordinates over 100,000 CPUs at over 170 sites in 34 countries, serving 8,000 physicists around the world.

InformationWeek has published an in-depth report on the public cloud, digging into the gritty details of cloud computing services from a dozen vendors. Download the report here (registration required).

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
Digital Transformation Myths & Truths
Transformation is on every IT organization's to-do list, but effectively transforming IT means a major shift in technology as well as business models and culture. In this IT Trend Report, we examine some of the misconceptions of digital transformation and look at steps you can take to succeed technically and culturally.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll