Why Personal Health Records Have Flopped - InformationWeek

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Why Personal Health Records Have Flopped
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JimInKS
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JimInKS,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/13/2012 | 6:24:05 PM
re: Why Personal Health Records Have Flopped
I think lack of standards and wide acceptance also plays a part. You don't have much confidence that whatever provider you see will be able to access or use your phr.
Number 6
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Number 6,
User Rank: Moderator
1/13/2012 | 6:09:33 PM
re: Why Personal Health Records Have Flopped
Paul, what are you basing your comments on? Peer-reviewed studies? Surveys and polls? Discussions with other people?

Or only your own opinion?

You're certainly entitled to your view, but his should have been clearly published by IW as an opinion piece.
Tronman
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Tronman,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/13/2012 | 6:01:01 PM
re: Why Personal Health Records Have Flopped
Thanks, but no thanks. I can take care of myself and I don't need some busybody "health" organization sticking their nose in my personal business. That's the real reason others are also unwilling to go along with this socialist, big brother crap.
MedicalQuack
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MedicalQuack,
User Rank: Moderator
1/13/2012 | 3:57:46 PM
re: Why Personal Health Records Have Flopped
I have watched this since PHRs have come out and have been a big advocate and have many posts on my blog but the average consumer is not sold yet and I do have to say for good reason as you mention it comes down to trust for a lot of it. We don't know who aggregates and sells what data today and know that insurers are on steroids when it comes to behavioral algorithms to predict and also drive compliance. It's like we fear losing some of our freedom and in a way that is correct unless you use HealthVault as an example which is not tethered and not owned by an insurer.

I have said for quite a while that we need to license and tax the data sellers for a couple of reasons, and this does not include browsers who use information internally to make searches better, but rather those like drug stores, insurers and so forth that make billions from getting "free taxpayer data" and then sell it. Walgreens said their data selling business is worth just under $800 million. What do they sell, well without a federal website and laws asking for disclosure, we don't know and again the consumer knows this too and nobody likes the unknown, so until something is done in this area, it's won't change much.

This practice also keeps the lines of inequality growing as it is tech war fare and corporations get richer with selling data they get for free and in the meantime states are having to put governor software systems in place as their servers slow down to a crawl to keep the bots out so consumers can have access, doesn't make sense does it? The very information sources that were set up for consumers is becoming difficult to access as corporate bots beat us to the punch.

I call it the alternative millionaire's tax to license and tax corporations that mine and sell data and make billions. Until some level of equality is derived here, the public is not going to trust in big numbers and for good reason. With huge profits for corporate USA in selling data they mine for free with not having to give anything back but rather keep taking we have a situation that I call "The Attack of the Killer Algorithms" for consumers and we just can't win, and thus so PHRs with the low levels of trust just kind of sit there.

http://ducknetweb.blogspot.com...
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