IT Certifications: 3 Ways To Judge Value - InformationWeek

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IT Certifications: 3 Ways To Judge Value
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BryanA300
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BryanA300,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/28/2015 | 3:10:57 AM
Re: Seems extensible
Interesting concept and subject to many arguments. For example many certifications doesn't really measure the knowledge and competence of an individual who attended a boot camp and study well the questions that will be ask on the test. Sure they can pass the test and be certified but know nothing what to do in the real world. Education and experience is still important. That is the reason why there is a gap berween business leaders and IT people because most IT doesn't understand the business. IT people know how to keep the system running and follow best practices but thats not enough in the business world. I am IT prson myself for about 30 years and have several certifications but when vendors like Microsoft make certifications more like a business by selling expensive books and training and forcing candidates to re-exam or recertify every 3 years it changes my perception about certification. Many vendors do it as an additional income to them, and not the means to measure IT persons knowledge and competence and complete understanding of the product. If the test and training materials are reasonable and the exam itself includes practical or lab that includes real world problems that a candidate need to solve then it will make the certification really valuable.   
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2014 | 9:19:28 AM
Re: Seems extensible
Lucius, Do you see employers willing to invest in keeping their employees' certs up to date, and in new certs? I was a bit surprised to see in our salary surveys how many IT people do get company-paid training. Maybe they do it on their own time, but at least it's not on their own dime. The downside from an employer's POV would be that these workers are then attractive to other employers, and job hopping is the best way to get a nice salary bump.
LuciusD110
IW Pick
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LuciusD110,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/23/2014 | 4:20:20 AM
Re: Seems extensible
I have a masters in computer science and have been doing these certifications for the last 30 years. I can tell you first hand that some of those certifications are way beyond what I went through in college - particularly the MCSD and MCSE. There are easy certs like A+ but the majority of them are not between HS and an associates degree in the technical arena. Employers want certifications more than general degrees. Technology changes every year - its the only way to keep up as fewer employers are willing to pay for in-house training and vendor classes.

I would hire a kid with a certification before I would ever hire someone with a business degree/MBA. The BA in business administration is the new high school diploma - everyone seems to have one. The MBA is now the equivalent of an associates degree. Without the technical training any general business degree is a worthless without the ability to understand the technology - it will get you a job at McDonalds but not Microsoft.
Lorna Garey
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100%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
5/22/2014 | 11:51:57 AM
Seems extensible
As high school diplomas become increasingly worthless on their own, from a hiring perspective, employers have people coming in with certificates for everything from project management to HVAC -- this isn't just an IT issue. Seems like a standard way to rate extended ed that's in between HS and an Associate's is really valuable.


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