Cloud Computing Is Still In Its Adolescence - InformationWeek
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Cloud Computing Is Still In Its Adolescence
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AS71
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AS71,
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3/2/2012 | 8:26:05 AM
re: Cloud Computing Is Still In Its Adolescence
They need to get the automation piece straight, as Microsoft just demonstrated with Azure (although it is unfair to compare MS OS with Linux on x86 or Linux on z).
ArtWittmann
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ArtWittmann,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2012 | 1:20:18 AM
re: Cloud Computing Is Still In Its Adolescence
I suppose it's possible, however the demographics for this survey were typical for our surveys. 10% were IT execs, 31% were IT managers, 36% were IT staff, the rest were LOB mangers, non-IT execs, consultants and "other".

There could be pocket use for stuff like development, testing or prototyping that respondents didn't know about, but I'd think that would be pretty limited. We did ask a gating question, respondents had to be involved in the cloud computing decision in some way, and we limited the survey to companies of more than 50 employees to take the smaller SMB folks out of the picture. I wrote a follow up article here: http://informationweek.com/new... that looks at how cloud services don't factor in returning the Moore's Law advantage to their customers (or at least I don't see it, and apparently the DOE doesn't see it either).

That's a pretty big give-away, so there really has to be a big value return somewhere else, for most IaaS service uses, I don't see what that is. You really need to be in a position where you need less on-staff expertise, and IaaS doesn't give you much of that.
pcalento011
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pcalento011,
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2/27/2012 | 11:55:09 PM
re: Cloud Computing Is Still In Its Adolescence
Re: "two-thirds of IT organizations either have decided the cloud isn't for them or have yet to pull the trigger. The core value of the cloud is, in fact, in question."

At Cloud Connect, Geva Perry, the author of "Thinking Out Cloud", challenged the typical audience (CIOs) responding to cloud surveys. Perry argued that CIOs are often the last to know when new technologies are being implemented. Do you think this "could" account for the 2-out-3 on the sidelines? --Paul Calento
ArtWittmann
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ArtWittmann,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/23/2012 | 5:05:27 PM
re: Cloud Computing Is Still In Its Adolescence
It's almost always a bad idea for departments within companies to buy SaaS services without IT's involvement (there are exceptions here depending on the nature of the service and whether your IT department is reasonably responsive.) SaaS is a no-brainer when the service is well outside of what IT normally does. We, for instance, use a service to conduct polls. Ours is a fairly self-contained need, and while our IT team could provide us with such a service, the service provider is constantly making improvements and offering new features. Something our IT wouldn't be able to do.

When you get into services that require integration with existing IT infrastructure, the problem is much more complex, and usually "depends" on a number of factors. There's no absolute answer (unless your IT team is just not responsive, then you do what you gotta do).
Sabrina
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Sabrina,
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2/23/2012 | 6:44:03 AM
re: Cloud Computing Is Still In Its Adolescence
Cloud computing is really a good technique in IT field
herman_munster
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herman_munster,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/22/2012 | 4:04:41 PM
re: Cloud Computing Is Still In Its Adolescence
I think something that needs to be considered is that as Web 2.0 technologies have evolved, so has IT pro's understanding of that technology. If asked, I would suggest that the only cloud computing plans my company has relate strictly to a private cloud. However, I would further suggest that my company has extensive plans for SaaS, IaaS, could storage and virtualization.

There's so much media hype surrounding cloud computing that most people no longer really understand exact what "cloud computing" means - it's become a term that's used, in some cases, to express any cloud related activity while in other cases it's a term specifically used to descrive cloud based elastic computing.

It also doesn't help that so many media publishers out there (not really this site but, certainly your competitors) only add to the ambiguity surrounding these topics with the language they use in articles written by authors who clearly don't fully understand the subject.

That's why it's refreshing, to me, to read this article. I think you really touched on something here that does a lot to describe the current state of cloud adoption. Thank you for sharing it with us!


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