Smoked By Windows Phone, Or Smoke And Mirrors? - InformationWeek

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Smoked By Windows Phone, Or Smoke And Mirrors?
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AS71
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AS71,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/28/2012 | 12:20:29 AM
re: Smoked By Windows Phone, Or Smoke And Mirrors?
Yes, and Droids or iPhone can perform all of these tasks. Windows Phone isn't demonstrating unique capabilities. They are demonstrating that setting up widgets, mailing lists, etc allows people to do things faster. Everyone who has ever taken this challenge probably feels that the store employees cheated by setting up automated tasks, which are also available in other phones, to win.
AS71
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AS71,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/28/2012 | 12:14:35 AM
re: Smoked By Windows Phone, Or Smoke And Mirrors?
This campaign is so pointless in the first place. The Microsoft employees are aware of the challenges and set up widgets on their phone so they can perform the tasks in half a second. Google, RIM or Apple could set up the same challenge, allow their employees to set up widgets to perform the tasks, and beat Windows Phone 99.99% of the time. The challenge doesn't prove that Windows smokes anything. It probably really annoys the people in their retail stores who feel cheated and definitely turns them off from considering a Windows Phone. Has anyone ever purchased a Windows Phone as a result of getting "smoked"?

Worst Microsoft marketing campaign since the Seinfeld commercial.
EVVJSK
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EVVJSK,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/27/2012 | 1:39:22 PM
re: Smoked By Windows Phone, Or Smoke And Mirrors?
I am sure there are many day to day tasks that are simpler with a Nokia S60 type phone with a physical keyboard on it than it is on a keyboard-less phone (Windows or otherwise). I can put my Nokia E71 in silent mode by simply doing a long press on the "#" key. I am guessing that would take at least 2 or 3 "actions" on a touch phone, depending upon what it took to navigate to the location that allowed that. I understand why some don't need Physical keyboards, but for simplifying tasks, they are hard to beat. It is a shame that Nokia has yet to bring to market a new Windows Phone with Physical keyboard (something simliar to their Symbian based E7 phone).
herman_munster
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herman_munster,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2012 | 6:16:27 PM
re: Smoked By Windows Phone, Or Smoke And Mirrors?
I dont know. I kind of see this whole campaign as largely pointless. Does it really matter if you can accomplish a task a little faster on an iPhone than on an Android phone, or vice versa with any combination of mobile platforms put head to head?

Does anyone really care if it takes a second or two less time to second an e-mail to 5 friends on a windows phone than on a Blackberry?

What really matters is stability of the platform, hardware and versatility. I'll base my platform decision on the device that works best for me - a device I can mount on a Linux machine to transfer media to and from without using specialized media sharing software, a device with a screen that I can actually read and which has a wide variety of software including a terminal and multi-format ebook reader.

And I wont care if it takes five seconds longer to spam my friends. I'm slow on sending stuff anyway.
FritzNelson
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FritzNelson,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2012 | 6:03:01 PM
re: Smoked By Windows Phone, Or Smoke And Mirrors?
At Mobile World Congress, I watched one of these contests, and the objective of one such challenge (the contestant had a BlackBerry) was to send an e-mail (pre-defined subject/message) to 5 friends. Microsoft works out the details of the test beforehand, and so these rules were concocted on the spot, agreed upon, and away they went. Microsoft won. But they did so because the Microsoft employee already had 5 friends set up on a quick contact item, so they just had to create the message, pick that contact, and voila. Quick & easy. Of course, the same thing COULD have been done on a BlackBerry, but the contestant was unaware that Microsoft was doing it this way. The crowd got pretty angry.

I'd think for $100 (the winner's prize), Microsoft could easily lose these and still prove its point. And make people happy (with $100).


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