Employee Fatigue: Hurting Your Business Ethics? - InformationWeek

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Employee Fatigue: Hurting Your Business Ethics?
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David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
9/16/2014 | 5:17:08 PM
Re: fatigue and parenthood
@SaneIT- And there's the problem. No one person should be so important that every time zone relies on them. How do we solve this problem? More hiring? More cross training? Teaching people to be more independent? This can't be good for anyone. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
9/16/2014 | 5:12:01 PM
Re: Employee Fatigue
@zerox203- Well said. I think part of the problem in IT is that perosn you mentioned working late on a Friday night is treated like a hero. I'd like to see a manager treat the people who go home on time like a hero. Sometimes we all have to stay late to finish something, but the real hero is the person who finishes their work in their normal time. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
9/16/2014 | 5:07:42 PM
Re: fatigue and parenthood
@danielcawrey- I think the worst part is that many companies don't give employees a choice. The work load simply requires working past reasonable time. It has been show repeatedly that productivity in knowledge workers goes significantly after about 6 hours. Very few knowledge workers are capable of knocking off then, though. 

Hiring more (good) workers and having them all work fewer hours is probably the best thing a company can do for itself, but the worst thing it can do for its stock. It is sad.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
9/16/2014 | 5:02:27 PM
Re: HALT
@susan- I love HALT. I've never heard it before. Can't say I make too many decisions while angry or lonely. I probably make a large number of my decisions while hungry or tired. Maybe i'll need to reconsider. I wonder though if there is ever a point in my existence where I'm not one of those four, especially hungry. :)
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
9/16/2014 | 4:47:47 PM
Re: Hangry
@Susan- Do you get more like Betty White or Bobcat Goldthwaite? My favorite of those Snickers ads was always the one by the late, great Robin Williams. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
9/16/2014 | 2:44:46 AM
Re: HALT
@Susan: I feel like I might not ever get anything done if I took that advice!  :p

Seriously, though, I do definitely put off most communicative tasks if I'm in a bad mood -- lest I say something I shouldn't!
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
9/15/2014 | 8:10:20 PM
HALT
The best career advice I ever got was to use HALT as a guideline as to whether it was the right time to make an important decision. Here's how it works: ask yourself "Am I Hungry Angry Lonely or Tired?" If you're any of those things, then HALT (see what I did there?) and take care of your own human needs before making that important decision.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
9/15/2014 | 8:07:15 PM
Hangry
This was eye-opening Dave (pun intended). I honestly never considered a connection between fatique and ethics, though i'm a firm believer that getting sufficient amounts of sleep and eating well help you perform at your best no matter at work or at home.

I can vouch for the fact that the Snickers commercials are spot-on. I am definitely NOT myself when I'm hungry, and have seen plenty of "hangry" behavior in myself and others.

In the interest of being a good employee, I'm going to eat a Snickers and have a nap now...
David Wagner
IW Pick
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
9/15/2014 | 7:29:59 PM
Re: fatigue and parenthood
@Thomas- You don't fighting it by forcing your people to sleep. You fight it by giving them the opportuniy to rest both during and away fromt he job.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
9/15/2014 | 4:32:34 PM
fatigue and parenthood
The problem with companies fighting fatigue is that creates a reason to discriminiate against new parents, for whom fatigue is unavoidable.
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