IT Dress Code: 10 Cardinal Sins - InformationWeek

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IT Dress Code: 10 Cardinal Sins
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mwalle
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mwalle,
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9/24/2014 | 9:14:37 AM
Cologne?!
Forgot about cologne and perfume.  I could probably handle an assault on the eyes with the clothing violations you've got, but an assault on the nose is something altogether different.
KevinRCasey
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KevinRCasey,
User Rank: Moderator
9/24/2014 | 10:01:59 AM
Re: Cologne?!
Good one, mwalle. I overlooked olfactory offenses, and such assualts on the nose are definitely real.
Stephane Parent
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Stephane Parent,
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9/24/2014 | 10:13:27 AM
Re: Cologne?!
It reminds me of a time when four of us shared a closed office. One of my colleagues took to eating garlic cloves after having some heart problems.

When we got the courage to tell him the garlic smell was too much, he decided to start splashing on cologne. The mixture of odours was putrid. Thankfully he switched to garlic extract pills and turned the dial down on the cologne.
jastroff
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jastroff,
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9/24/2014 | 10:29:28 AM
Re: Cologne?!
Sounds like an episode from the TV program The Office. That's not a good sign :-)
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
9/28/2014 | 2:36:46 AM
Re: Cologne?!

@Stephane  Parent     Funny thing about Cologne,   I never thought it could be a problem, unless you are in a confined area and the persons you are sharing it with does not like what you are wearing.  

Happened to a colleague of mine and I was quite surprised - would those offend by his cologne prefer the alternative ?   

Some just can't win and  there are some who will never be  pleased or pacified.

Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
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9/28/2014 | 12:38:33 PM
Re: Cologne?!
I think that we shouldn't equate one's dress code with his or competence. In reality, we judge and get judged based on what we wear. This is why I try to dress professional at work, but I would love to show up everyday wearing sweats and sneakers. I kid you not, I seriously considered becoming a gym teacher for this reason. I never pursued it, but it definitely does seem like a perk to me. Some of my best dressed coworkers are the laziest. I truly believe they fall under the radar of the supervisors longer than others based on the professional appearance they give off. Unfortunately, it's a facade for some. It reminds me of a dress rehearsal. Obviously, this doesn't pertain to all well dressed people. I am just referring to some of the best dressed at my job. They show up in their Sunday best and work like it's a lazy Sunday. I think the same could apply to IT workers. Don't underestimate or overestimate someone by their dress code. Looks can be deceiving and don't always judge a book by it's cover. Doing so, may result in being pleasantly surprised or deeply disappointed. I think if I dressed more casual at work, it wouldn't mean that I am less effective, less knowledgeable, or less competent than when I dress up. I think it all comes down to job integrity, experience, skills, and knowledge.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
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9/28/2014 | 12:55:30 PM
Re: Cologne?!
@Technocrat, I never really thought about cologne or perfume being much of a problem either, until I worked with a colleague who would complain if anyone used scented hand lotion or perfume. She would overreact to the point that I no longer would wear anything scented again at work. I stopped wearing perfume and started using plain, unscented hand lotions. She still complains about others' scents, the smell of cleaning products, air fresheners, food, etc.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
9/24/2014 | 10:47:14 AM
Re: Nudity on the show floor
I recall an occassion in the 1980s when one well-known contributor to a publication I used to work for came down to the exhibit-hall floor of a prominent industry trade show in his bath robe and slippers. Needless to say it caused a stir and security guards had him removed. Was it something about losing his room key? Not sure, but he should have used the house phone to call the front desk and wait upstairs. Needless to say we stopped using that guy as a contributor.
JonNLakeland
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JonNLakeland,
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9/24/2014 | 9:47:18 AM
hats
But....I *like* hats! :( Ball caps seem too casual for a work environment, but a nice fedora, or classy "hipster hat" seems moderately ok to me. Then again, maybe I'm who you're writing too...
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
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9/24/2014 | 11:12:12 AM
Re: hats
Don't give up your hat, @JonNLakeland -- wear it strong, don't listen to these doubters! 
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
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9/24/2014 | 12:21:06 PM
Re: hats
Hats I can deal with in a business setting. Some people make hats really work. But low-riding jeans, for men or women, no. When you're stuck behind this person, it's a loooong tradeshow escalator ride.
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Strategist
9/24/2014 | 5:11:10 PM
Re: hats
Seriously, the baggy pants look on a dude with a thong while he is crawling under the desk to check connections almost guarantees a long break to the coffee bar.  Yes, it happened.
dwebb608
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dwebb608,
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9/24/2014 | 11:38:20 AM
Re: hats
In my eyes, hats have 3 functions, all of which are outdoor-appropriate

1) They keep my head warm when it's below 0 (standard Chicago winter weather)

2) They keep the sun out of my eyes (useful in the bleachers)

3) They help protect my bald pate from sunburn (lobster red is not an appropriate skin color)

This puts them in the same category as the cycling and exercise gear -- doff them once you're inside!
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
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9/24/2014 | 10:13:56 AM
But what about...
OK, I get the "no Star Trek" rule. Even Piccard had to pull down his uniform blouse every time he got out of the command chair. But what if you really rock the bow-tied look of the 11th Doctor? That would be OK, wouldn't it? How about if you promised to leave the fez at home -- would that help?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
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9/30/2014 | 11:23:26 PM
Re: But what about...
I know a few people who can truly rock a bow-tie. I'm not one of those people, but I'd allow for bow-tie exceptions, even if inspired by Dr. Who.
ColinM446
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ColinM446,
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9/24/2014 | 10:18:49 AM
Costumes...
The only semi-exception I would make to this list is the point about costumes. Some firms do have Halloween office parties. If you are in a firm that does have a Halloween party then, on that day and that day alone wearing a Star* (or other Galactic) uniform MAY be acceptable. The other 364 days of the year costumes are off limits in any sort of professional office...
KevinRCasey
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KevinRCasey,
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9/24/2014 | 11:18:41 AM
Re: Costumes...
Fair enough: Per ColinM446, we will hereby exempt corporate Halloween parties so that the revised statute shall read: "On that day and that day alone wearing a Star* (or other Galactic) uniform MAY be acceptable."

(Please note the MAY in Colin's language. This decision should not be made lightly.)
Somedude8
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Somedude8,
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9/24/2014 | 11:21:59 AM
Hawaiian Shirts
Glad that Hawaiian shirts didn't make the list. I would miss my favorite bright yellow one.
dwebb608
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dwebb608,
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9/24/2014 | 11:43:56 AM
Beards
Haven't seen your neck in a few weeks?  I haven't seen mine in 34 Years!

Still, when it gets too shaggy, it needs trimming before my wife buys me a flea collar or gets me a bear license!
MemphisITDude
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MemphisITDude,
User Rank: Strategist
9/24/2014 | 1:04:07 PM
Jeans Day Forever...
I'd expand the beard comment to include any exposed chest hair - please button up or buy a t-shirt! The job descriptions mentioned (ie "monitoring the network" and "provisioning virtual machines") clearly do not target executives. But before scoffing at your IT friends' dress during work hours, keep in mind they may have just put in an all-nighter or weekend to keep things running smoothly for you. As a consultant, I don't ever dress casual, but back when I was an employee showing up late and casual the day after an all-nighter was like a job benefit everyone mutually agreed on...
GeneA198
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GeneA198,
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9/24/2014 | 1:06:18 PM
Kilts
I think you missed a good one. (Of course this may count as nudity)  Do not show up in a Kilt, particularly if you are wearing it in the traditional manner.  This actually happened at one place I worked.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
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9/24/2014 | 2:15:18 PM
Re: Kilts
Come on, I love a man in a kilt! Well, assuming he looks like that dude in Outlander ...

http://www.accesshollywood.com/outlander-cast-what-is-it-about-a-man-in-a-kilt_video_2270137

 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
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9/25/2014 | 8:10:25 AM
Re: Kilts
Gene, 

I don't think you have a point there. If you are in Scotland, or even if you a Scot living and working abroad there is absolutely anything bad in wearing your Kilt. It's perfectly acceptable.

The fact that it doesn't belong to your culture doesn't mean it's wrong. 

-Susan
Number 6
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Number 6,
User Rank: Moderator
9/24/2014 | 2:22:16 PM
Scruffy Facial Hair
How about not looking like your razor broke several days ago? Keep it neat.

Oh, wait... Sorry, Kevin.
KevinRCasey
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KevinRCasey,
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9/24/2014 | 3:56:57 PM
Re: Scruffy Facial Hair
Touché.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
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9/24/2014 | 3:05:35 PM
Telecommuter attire
Those of us who work at home face hazards that go beyond Casual Friday. I once sat down to a morning web conference (well, it might have been 11 am ... noon) still in my bathrobe and was surprised to see the video camera turn on. I turned it off quickly, but still ...
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
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9/25/2014 | 1:31:43 PM
Re: Telecommuter attire
@David F. Carr> That's funny. I have a paranoia about that kind of thing, though I haven't got to the stage of putting a post-it over the camera lens on my Macbook yet.

 

On a related note, this is one of my favorite Dilbert strips on the matter (reconstruct at your leisure):

 

   http // dilbert.com/strips/comic/1994-06-07/
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
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9/25/2014 | 8:01:57 AM
Hats: The odd one out
Kevin, 

I find it quite hard to believe that anyone in his/her right mind can actually go to the office wearing any of the things mentioned. I don't even consider jeans and T-shirts appropriate for the office. All of them are just "things" that I don't consider part of a decent work-related wardrobe.

I would never hire anyone who dares to go to the office wearing pijamas, no matter how great software engineer they could be. Did they actually take a shower before going to work, or jumped straight from their bed to the car and to the office? But ...  

"Nothing looks more stupid than a hat." Ladies and gentlemen alike ... " <- Stupid?

Hats? I centainly believe you are wrong in that bit. There is absolutely anything wrong with wearing hats when you are matching them with the appropriate clothing. They are classic, elegant, which is something that seems to be missing from the rest of the "things" in the slideshow. Maybe the view of a hat is different in Europe than in the US. 

I know the CEO of a successful startup who always wears a hat. The hat has become part of his personality, almost a signature item that you associate with him and his company. He is always impecable and sends an image of classic elegance to the startup world, which sometimes seems to be in need of such example.

And he is not the only one wearing hats. Others in this part of the world wear hats, too. Even I was wearing a navy blue hat yesterday to complement a navy blue dress and shoes.

What you wear and how you wear it makes a startement about your personality. What you wear mirrors such things as laziness, poor hygene, it tells if the person is careless, or goes into detail; etc.

Once, during an interview, the person interviewing me didn't miss opportunity to look at my shoes. Some years after that, I asked her about this. She said that a few things tell so much about the person as the shoes they are wearing. She paid special attention to the detail and would never tolerate anyone badly dressed at work. 

In terms of what some people wear in their home-office, well, it's an office and the place where you work after all. You shouldn't be wearing your pijamas in your home-office either during your working hours. 

-Susan
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
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9/25/2014 | 1:44:34 PM
Re: Hats: The odd one out
@Susan Fourtané>

 

"Once, during an interview, the person interviewing me didn't miss opportunity to look at my shoes. Some years after that, I asked her about this. She said that a few things tell so much about the person as the shoes they are wearing. She paid special attention to the detail and would never tolerate anyone badly dressed at work."

 

Interesting, but I feel that's a shame. I'll bet she missed out on a lot of good people if she judged them by their shoes. Doubly so for many men for whom, and by golly I hate to be clichéd here, shoes are just lumps of leather and rubber that they stick their feet into to make walking more comfortable. I will tell you for free that I would not get a job with that lady. To me, you could interprety somebody wearing exquisite shoes to a job interview as either trying too hard, or focused too much on appearance. This is the same flawed logic as the "tidy desk, tidy mind" idiom. I always liked the follow up to that one of "Then what does an empty desk signify?"

vnewman2
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vnewman2,
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9/25/2014 | 6:59:39 PM
Re: Hats: The odd one out
I believe that this type of thinking is from the school of thought that if you care about your appearance you care about your job.  It's much like the idea that completing your GED isn't the equivalent to completing high school because graduating from school after 12 years shows you can follow through on a long-term plan and demonstrated commitment along with the ability to delay gratification.

I don't necessarily think either one of those things are true, but it is an assumption people make.

What ends up happening is often people don't have enough hours in the day to sleep, eat, workout, groom themselves properly, plus get all their work done.  And if you will get fired for not doing your job, but not for not having a neatly pressed outfit, well, obviously that's low priority.  Something's got to give.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
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9/26/2014 | 3:54:50 AM
Re: Hats: The odd one out
vnewman, 

What I said and explained more about it in the comment below this one was not about an assumption. There was psychology and years of observation behind. And of course, anything is absolute. 

"What ends up happening is often people don't have enough hours in the day to sleep, eat, workout, groom themselves properly, plus get all their work done."

How long do you think it takes you groom yourself properly? What does this mean, by the way? Does it mean taking a shower, putting a dress on, a pair of stocking and shoes and go to the office? It takes you less than putting on pants, a t-shirt, socks, and sneakers to go to the gym, also taking a shower, of course. 

Thinking that wearing a well-pressed outfit takes too much time is an assumption people make. 

So, do you think it's Okay to go to work wearing the outfits Kevin posted because it's too much work to wear something else?  

-Susan 
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
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9/26/2014 | 6:13:10 AM
Re: Hats: The odd one out
How long does it take? It depends on a host of factors: are you a man or a woman? Do you have children? Do you workout in the morning? There's definitely a difference between merely getting dressed ie putting clothes on and looking polished. I walk into work like lIberace every day. But I also have a child and that means I dont have time to make myself breakfast too. This means after I arrive in the office I head immediately back out for coffee and breakfast. On the other hand my boss walks in like she crawled out from under a rock and I know she works hard and she knows much more about the firm than I do. She's been there 12 years and I've been there one. But she looks like a schlep. And people don't really respect what she has to say often. They should because she knows her stuff. So what's happening is people are making an assumption that's incorrect albeit based on psychological truths.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
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9/26/2014 | 3:15:28 AM
Re: Hats: The odd one out
jgherbert, 

I don't think the little I wrote actually gives the real idea of what she meant and what she looked at when looking at your shoes. It was not appearance what she was looking at. It was deeper. She didn't judge people by their shoes but something else behind. 

She was not looking for designer shoes, or exquisite shoes. They could be old shoes. It was how you had cared for them, how clean they were, if you had actually bothered to pay attention to your shoes, which is something that is not immediately visible unless someone looks down. 

If you think about it, it really tells a lot about how the person deals with his work.

If you put that into work perspective, how many people overlook details in their job just because they know no one is going to be looking at that little thing but at what is most visible. 

In fact, I learned a lot about the way she observed little details. She was always right in her judgement. She was a very kind person who showed you you always can do better, you always can improve yourself. She knew something was wrong with you before you could say something. She showed interest and asked you if there was something happening, something that worried you. 

"Doubly so for many men for whom, and by golly I hate to be clichéd here, shoes are just lumps of leather and rubber that they stick their feet into to make walking more comfortable. " <- As I said, if those lumps of leather and rubber were clean and showed you had taken care of them, pay some attention to them, and your skills and personality matched the job, that was fine. 

As for the desk, I have noticed that when my desk is a mess with piles of papers, things I can't find underneath those papers, and everything surrounding my laptop I find it hard to focus. I work better when I have an empty desk with just a few things there and in order, which is not always the case. But I am just telling you that the difference can influence the effectiveness of how I use time, for example. I'll stop here, or this will be a book instead of a comment. :) I hope I clarified the shoes thing a bit. 

-Susan
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
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9/28/2014 | 4:58:55 PM
Re: Hats: The odd one out
@Susan Fourtané>

If you think about it, it really tells a lot about how the person deals with his work.

--I really don't believe it does. It tells you whether their appearance is important to them. Heck, if we all were to judge suitability for employment based on dress sense, we'd have no programmers. 

If you put that into work perspective, how many people overlook details in their job just because they know no one is going to be looking at that little thing but at what is most visible.

--By that logic, she should have been checking for clean underwear. Shoes are a visible part of our exterior appearance. Perhaps somebody who has less than perfectly maintained shoes in fact realizes that the exterior is just a shallow veneer whose appearance can be manipulated easily in a hundred different ways, and in fact it's what's under the clothes that truly matters.

 

Anyway, if it worked for her - and from the sounds of it for you - then that's fine. I do get very frustrated though with the idea that people make a hiring decision based on what, to me personally, is an irrational judgment. With that said, I had a meeting with my COO last week, and after reading your post I did give my shoes a quick shine. See how shallow _I_ am? ;-)

Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
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10/2/2014 | 3:34:17 PM
Re: Hats: The odd one out
jgherbert, 

I lost my post to an error of the system. I will not write all again. Sorry for that. Just two things: 

"With that said, I had a meeting with my COO last week, and after reading your post I did give my shoes a quick shine. See how shallow _I_ am? ;-)"

How nice. :D I am glad you did. He was probably impressed. ;) 

I had written a little crude observation about appearances and how appearances even matter in what people say, but not really think. Too bad I lost the post. :( 

I'll come back later to tell you about an experience I had about how appearance matter, later when I am less upset for having lost the post. 

-Susan

 

 
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
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10/2/2014 | 4:02:00 PM
Re: Hats: The odd one out
@Susan Fourtané> Ack, I'm sorry to hear that; I hate when I lose all those thoughts and like you I frequently can't contemplate going back and writing them all out again!

By the way, my COO is a lady, which put me doubly on guard after your story! ;-)

 
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
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9/28/2014 | 2:22:57 AM
Re: Hats: The odd one out

@jgherbert       It is not just females that look at how you dress ( or shoes)  - there some execs who think they are fashionistas and will look you up and down - stopping at your shoes.  

It happened to me - at the time I had a terrible pair - and I just wondered what this over-paid exec was thinking.  I knew of course - so as soon as possible I bought some new ones.

jgherbert
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jgherbert,
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9/28/2014 | 4:52:51 PM
Re: Hats: The odd one out
@Technocrati>

It is not just females that look at how you dress ( or shoes)  - there some execs who think they are fashionistas and will look you up and down - stopping at your shoes. 

--I totally believe that ;-)

It happened to me - at the time I had a terrible pair - and I just wondered what this over-paid exec was thinking.  I knew of course - so as soon as possible I bought some new ones.

--And with your lovely new shoes, are you a different person, somehow more talented or suited to your job? No, you are not. Shoes do not make the man (or woman). Somebody judging your competence based on your shoes I would argue is trying to convince themselves that care in one area equates to care in another. It doesn't, in my experience - which isn't to say it can't, but that I don't believe there's a strict correlation.

jgherbert
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jgherbert,
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9/25/2014 | 1:27:22 PM
Beards and Sandals
So look, I understand that sandals are considered a "no no" and beards likewise. What I want to know then, is this:

"Who is going to have the guts to go tell that to the mainframe support team?"

You used to be able to tell the Unix and VAX system admins apart based on presence (or otherwise) of sandals, socks, garish ties, flared collars, etc.
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
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9/25/2014 | 1:38:24 PM
So, Comedy Aside...
Lots of fun on this post, but actually there's a real problem with the dress code because there simply isn't a standard; it's very much defined by the company at which you work and to some extent, even, the job role you have. 

For example, my own experience of US banks/financials is that they are suit/tie places across the board. Meanwhile working for an EU financial it was all "business casual". I've worked in an enterprise where I was told with humor but absolute sincerity at the interview that if I showed up on day 1 with "that tie on" it would be cut off me rather unceremoniously ;-) Another Enterprise leaned towards neat pants (trousers) and shirts (not polo shirts), but did not go for ties. Elsewhere I've found clusters of geeks who break the normal rules and dress like rebels where the rest of the company is more formal. Then finally I guess are the startups, especially where it involves coders or security wonks, where the dress code amounts to "please wear some", because the job you do is more important than how suave you look when you do it.

Anything customer-facing though - meetings, presentations, etc., to third parties, requires a step up. Many managers in the more relaxed organizations I worked at would have a suit in the car or in their office just in case the need to up their game arose during the day.

I suspect that the biggest problem as a new employee is figuring out what the dress code really is for your job level and role :)
mikeballai
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mikeballai,
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9/25/2014 | 2:47:46 PM
Just be clean
In all the years I've been in IT, the real problem with some people is that they just don't understand the word clean. Shower, shave, shampoo, and shoe shine aren't part of their work vocabulary. Add that their office space overflows with junk. I can understand if someone pulls an all-nighter coding, just don't make that your perpetual appearance.  
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
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9/28/2014 | 2:26:55 AM
Re: Just be clean

@mikeballai     I agree.  I don't think that is too much to ask, but you would be surprised by some tech types.  

In my area, engineers think t-shirts are the way to go  and if you dare wear something else - you get this look from them.    No wonder we don't get much respect.   How serious can you take someone in a t-shirt ?  

 It makes me sick.

jgherbert
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jgherbert,
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9/28/2014 | 5:10:36 PM
Re: Just be clean
@Technocrati>

How serious can you take someone in a t-shirt ?

--Interesting question. It has never bothered me, obectively speaking, because I'm usually listening to the opinion, not examining the state of dress. Of course, I'm playing devil's advocate somewhat in this thread because I believe that research indicates that most people's opinions are subconsciously (if not consciously) affected by the appearance of the person making the statement. But in a work environment, I try to look past that. It's the same reason I don't have my CCIE in my email signature - its presence (or absence) shouldn't make any difference to the validity of my responses; I'm either right or I'm wrong, and the cert means nothing in that context.

--Another interesting side note is accent. I'm British and have a 'home counties' accent (around London, but not a London accent), and I have been assured that my accent gives my opinions extra credibility and give me a additional perceived 10 iQ points or so. Beats me why, but I guess I can see why some accents might lead the listener to dismiss the opinion for all the wrong reasons :-/

anon2290601880
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anon2290601880,
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9/28/2014 | 6:01:49 PM
Re: Just be clean
It's probably not just the t-shirt. With the same criteria of how you would dress for a job interview (and a job you really wanted), you are far more likely to be on target. 

If you place the attention to the principle that what you do matters, and show the discipiine to put that across, there would be little need for a dress code. 
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
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9/29/2014 | 2:20:09 PM
Re: Just be clean

@jgherbert      I agree- shoes certainly don't make the man, but the industry I work in is a little different from the norm.  I work in the entertainment industry and as we all know -  this industry places a lot of weight on  the superficial.   So while the shoes had no barring on my effectiveness, I have to acknowledge the psychosis that runs through the veins of most entertainment execs.    

 

You have to ask yourself what are my goals ?   Do I want to be an engineer or eventually get into management ?   If the latter is the choice then investing in new shoes might be a smart move.  

But I agree there is no direct correlation to the state of one's shoes and their resultingng ability to do the job. : ) 

Technocrati
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Technocrati,
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9/29/2014 | 2:29:28 PM
Re: Just be clean

--Another interesting side note is accent. I'm British and have a 'home counties' accent (around London, but not a London accent), and I have been assured that my accent gives my opinions extra credibility and give me a additional perceived 10 iQ points or so.

 

@jgherbert   I am so glad you brought this up, it has been a little known aspect of this quirky society that has annoyed me for many years.   The ol'  "you have a accent, so you must be much smarter than us none accent speaking people are !"   I have seen this erroneous thinking carried out, thoughout my entire career, it was cute at first, now it is down right insulting.

British accents are approx. worth 10 + and you will have hit the jackpot if you have a German one ....that one is at least 50.   What a joke and I give kudos to you for even mentioning it.  

It is usually the (ironically) unspoken  word  amongst execs and HR.

jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
10/2/2014 | 4:15:01 PM
Re: Just be clean
@Technocrati>

"I am so glad you brought this up, it has been a little known aspect of this quirky society that has annoyed me for many years."

Sorry, I didn't read any further - it didn't sound like your opinion was worth considering. *coughs* ;-)

(yes, quite) I shouldn't complain about it I suppose, as it's to my advantage perhaps, but it is interesting how certain accents can raise you up or, equally, put you down, quite unfairly.

Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
10/2/2014 | 5:05:07 PM
Re: Just be clean

@jgherbert   No worries, I guess I would take advantage of any moron who thinks I am smarter because I have one of their childhood favorite accents.   Who said life was fair or even that most are smart ?  

Good thing we are writing this because I probably wouldn't understand you through the thick British accent - being all less inteligent and all.   : ) 

impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
9/26/2014 | 12:26:43 PM
Personal style and business style
 

I think part of the challenge  is that work attire is no longer standard. It was easier when people knew exactly what was expected from them in the office from a clothing perspective. Business casual has multiple meaning depending on the company and not everyone is good at pulling their clothing together. Whether we want to admit it or not people judge others by their overall appearance, research supports this over and over again. While some may think it's unnecessary I still think it's important to dress in a professional manner in business meetings and wear clothing that says I am doing business not going to the gym or the beach. From there everyone can express their own personal style.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
9/28/2014 | 8:32:56 PM
There's casual then there's too casual
Ha.  A Star Trek uniform is an upgrade.  I once worked in an IT department and Friday was considered casual - a co-worker consistently showed up in surgical scrubs until mgt told him that he was dressed a little bit too casually for the office.
KevinRCasey
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KevinRCasey,
User Rank: Moderator
9/29/2014 | 9:57:06 AM
Re: There's casual then there's too casual
Good call on hospital scrubs. I actually considered including them here (and know of what you speak), but ultimately saw them in the same vein as sleepwear. But you're right - unless you're a doctor/nurse/healthcare worker, leave the OR scrubs at home.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
9/29/2014 | 1:21:56 PM
Style without distraction

An overriding point many people are making is that our work attire should not distract from our competency, I think that's most important. If someone's clothing detracts from their capabilities it's a problem. While everyone wants to express their sense of style being careful in the office is probably your best option.

kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 3:10:55 PM
IT and academia have many of the same clothing issues
I worked in academia for while and oh the socks and sandles! they were everywhere. Coming from a lab enviroment, I always had a thing against open toed shoes in the office. (In a lab they are down right dangerous due to heavy equipment, corrosive chemicals and such) For me, the most offensive thing at the office was the ripped up post college grunge style that made them look like they just didn't care.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Author
9/30/2014 | 11:05:34 PM
Re: IT and academia have many of the same clothing issues

kstaron- Just curious did the unusual footwear choices make you question the individuals professional choices?

freespiritny25
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freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
10/22/2014 | 11:25:52 AM
IT Dreas Code: 10 Cardina Sins
"Never wear anything to work that you would also wear to bed." Great article..burn the Jorts and PLEASE never, ever socks with sandals. Great list of rules! I am lucky enough to wear a uniform daily, so I will definitely avoid getting arrested by the fashion police.
ANON1247032252192
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ANON1247032252192,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/10/2014 | 9:41:01 AM
IT Dress Code
Great article and slideshow.  I think strategically scheduled MIRROR TIME at the enterprise (not On the Enterprise) could be done at the start of the work day, at breaktime, at lunchtime, and at the end of the work day.  Also, let's not forget about the BUBBY system.  Yelp for help.


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