Windows 10: 11 Big Changes - InformationWeek

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Windows 10: 11 Big Changes
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NancyT225
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NancyT225,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/2/2014 | 12:39:13 PM
Windows 10
I hated Windows 8.  I run it in the desktop mode and have reluctantly learned my way around most of the things I want to do with it.  I am a mouse person through and through so the touch screen features were of no interest to me.  If windows 7 had been available on my new computer I would have stayed there.  That said, I'm not sure if I will upgrade to 10 unless I have to.  Some of the new features appeal to me but I will be cautious about changing anything.  I am fluent in computers but mostly self taught.  I am almost 70 years old and have been working on a computer since 1985.

When the OS becomes too hard to manage, we older folks will hang on to the easiest, least stressful system to do our computing.  When I look behind the scenes of my computer, I don't know what many of the programs do or if I even need them.  I don't want to have to call a tech every time I have a slight problem with my computer.  

So I will wait and see what things look like before I decide what to do.  I am a great believer in less is more....
JohnK546
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JohnK546,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/2/2014 | 12:38:56 PM
Re: Utility is not Microsoft's Focus
I'm a programmer, and I have absolutely no problem.  It seems as though you are focusing on doing it the way "you've been doing it"  and not trying to see new way to do it.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
10/2/2014 | 12:38:49 PM
Looks Good
Sounds like MS has learned a lot from it's Win 8 fiasco. This is more what you would have expected from them back then when they blended Touch and Traditional. I see no reason this won't fly in the enterprise world when the time comes.

But that time won't be when product released. Like many, our global company just made transition from Win XP to Win 7 a couple of years ago. I think it will be awhile, and Win 10 will need to show it brings something to table over what Win 7 doing now. Otherwise we will hang on to Win 7 like we did XP.
JohnK546
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JohnK546,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/2/2014 | 12:35:21 PM
Re: More unappealing than appealing
I know this to be absolutely untrue.  I am a developer, and it really easy to develop/deploy on any microsoft ecosystem device and the store.  It's amazing how many people come out and bash microsoft for the play they made.  Many of the "gripers" are simply people who refuse to learn anything new.  I am far more productive with 8 than I ever was with 7.  And for the love of christ, quit whining about the start menu.  If you are unable to actually see the new app installed on the tile, right click and pin to taskbar, then you do not need to be using a computer period.  
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
10/2/2014 | 12:35:01 PM
Re: Windows 9?
In other news, this whole Windows 10 thing has opened up a nice set of possible new names.


  • Windows X
  • X-Windows
  • Windows OSX
  • WindX ?  (courtesy of a friend of mine)

Any others?
jgherbert
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0%
jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
10/2/2014 | 12:32:07 PM
Re: Windows 9?
@Bhargava> "What happened to Windows 9?"

Rumor has it that Windows 7 8 9.

j.
JohnK546
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JohnK546,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/2/2014 | 12:31:31 PM
Re: Unified experience
Yes, it means just that.  I have been using Win 8.1 on my Lumia 920, my PC at home, and yes even my Xbox gets in on all the action.  Ondrive is the one stop share shop, and you can share with other users as well.
anon5128868607
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50%
anon5128868607,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/2/2014 | 12:19:06 PM
Re: Windows 9?
Rumor has it they had to bypass Windows 9 because code that checks to see what version of Windows is running, specifically looking for Windows 95 or 98, doesn't bother to look for a second digit. It would see the 9 and assume it's an ancient unsupported OS...
Tech Since 1980
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0%
Tech Since 1980,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/2/2014 | 12:03:58 PM
Utility is not Microsoft's Focus
Microsoft broke into the market by building the absolute best software.  Up until the early years of this millennium they continued the trend.  Then they exhausted their list of "gotta-have" new features.

Now they focus 90% of their efforts on building products overburdened with flashy junk to impress newbies and high level management.  The core functionality is still there, but experienced users have to spend "forever" trying to find out where they hid them.

I've been coding SQL for 15 years.  SQL Server 2012's management console significanty slows down my development.  (So much so that I develop in SS 2008 and transfer the code to 2012 on my customer's machines.)  There are extra keystrokes to do many of the common functions and so many stupid little pop-ups that it drives me nuts.  (SQL is SQL, your miracle worker techs still have to code, down and dirty.)  But here's the bottom line:

Their products demo incredibly well to newly minted MBA's as well as C level managers.  Both these types of folks look at all the wizards and shortcuts and think "WOW, now I can do a bunch of this stuff on my own without having to know much about the system or the underlying data.  And if it's easier for me, it's gotta be a lot easier for my techs!"  Wrong.

I was a marketing support tech, (read, I gave customer demos for one of the Big 3 IT companies) for 10 years before I went into pure tech.  I WOULD LOVE TO DEMO AND SELL MICROSOFT'S NEW PRODUCTS!  But I don't recommend that any of my friends or better customers upgrade unless a specific new feature is a mission critical game changer.


Microsoft is still one of the best run companies out there.  They know how to MARKET.  Everything else seems to fall by the wayside.  I only wish I owned more Microsoft stock.
Phil C.
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Phil C.,
User Rank: Strategist
10/2/2014 | 11:58:35 AM
More unappealing than appealing
Microsoft has become enamored of touch-centric interfaces.  I've used both mouse/trackball-centered and touch-centered interfaces, and the the touch-centered interfaces are, by far, the slowest and least productive, with the highest error rates.  For graphics and engineering design work they are utterly useless.  This new obsession is an echo of Microsoft's earlier obsession with the Web of 18-20 years ago, when Windows XP was brought out, making everything Web-centric.  In the real world users don't work in Web-centric or touch-centric environments.  This is utter lunacy, a result of a marketing department that is out of touch with their customers.  The reason Microsoft gets away with it is because they're currently the 800-pound gorilla in the consumer computing world, although that gorilla may have shed 50-100 pounds since they foisted Vista on their customer base.  This is reflected in institutional users clinging to Windows XP, switching from Microsoft Office to OpenOffice or LibreOffice, and abandoning Microsoft for Apple or Linux.

Another drawback of Microsoft's operating systems since Windows 8 came out is a deliberate move to shut out third-party software and build a "walled garden", where only Microsoft-branded programs run optimally, or run at all.  They are trying to copy Apple's business model, which might work fine for the basic user who doesn't need much more than an email program, a word processor, a spreadsheet and a presentation manager, but it doesn't meet the needs of "power users" who use computers outside that narrow range.  As a result of this shift in policy, I and many other Microsoft clients are gradually abandoning them and moving to systems such as Linux, where serious users aren't subject to the whims of non-technical marketing executives and software that runs today can be expected to still run and be useful five to ten years from now.
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