Windows 10: 11 Big Changes - InformationWeek

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Windows 10: 11 Big Changes
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ArshdeepV671
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ArshdeepV671,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/6/2014 | 9:45:18 AM
Re: Unified experience
You could already do that with Windows 8.

 

You can access all your images on OneDrive through your xBox One, laptop, tablet or phone. You can also store, access and edit your word documents and other files across different windows devices you own. Even the tabs/sites that I have open in IE on my laptop/tablet can be seen on my windows phone.

 

I believe they are just improving the functionality and trying to make the experience much better.
dschmidt152
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dschmidt152,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/6/2014 | 9:42:28 AM
Re: Listen to customers
BillB,

You are correct about the joint effort.

Criticisim of Windows most likely relates to the extrem;y limited and archaic FAT (File Allocation Table) structure needed for compatibility with older versions of Windows , DOS and embedded versions thereof.

My biggest complaint is that Windows as well as UNIX does not support a versioning file system (for an example see OPenVMS) and more advanced enterprise grade allocation and security controls.

 

Dave
BillB031
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BillB031,
User Rank: Moderator
10/6/2014 | 9:23:42 AM
Re: Listen to customers
Side note since you mentioned it.  I was under the impression Microsoft co-developed OS/2 with IBM in the mid 80's...  I don't think they ripped off anything.
Stephane Parent
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Stephane Parent,
User Rank: Moderator
10/6/2014 | 8:25:03 AM
Re: Listen to customers
DOS restricted NTFS? You'll have to explain what you mean by that. NTFS was ripped off IBM OS/2's HPFS by Microsoft and included into NT 3.1. I'm not sure how it is restricted by or to DOS.

For that matter, I'm not sure why a decades-old FS is inherently a bad thing. NTFS offers journaling, ADS, compression, VSS, transactional support, encryption, quotas, and UTF-16 support. Please enlighten me and tell me what a newer, less mature, product would offer above and beyond these features.
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
10/4/2014 | 2:27:59 PM
Re: Listen to customers
I really don't understand why MS ignores the users of their OS. I hope they have listened for 10 but it seems like they still like to hang on to their ideas even though users hate them.
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
10/4/2014 | 2:20:33 PM
Re: Their Days Are Numbered

There are always MS haters out there. No matter if you hate or love them the fact remains they have the market share on OS's. They ultimately put out a good product.

jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
10/4/2014 | 1:00:42 PM
Re: Listen to customers
It's been all downhill since DOS 3.0.

Microsoft is a necessary evil for the time being. Can't live with it, can't live without it. It's trying to evolve so it doesn't die, but it's doing such a bad job. Breaking up the company might have worked better. Maybe not. In the meantime, until the next paradigm shift is complete, we are stuck with it.
TommyO738
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TommyO738,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/4/2014 | 12:43:12 PM
Re: How about managemernt???
Of course you can set the start menu to have no tiles. Simply right-click on them and remove them. You will probably be able to set UAC to disable non-admin users from pinning tiles to the start menu in the final version
TommyO738
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50%
TommyO738,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/4/2014 | 12:37:51 PM
Re: Listen to customers
What are you doing installing Windows 7 if you dislike Microsoft so much? You should get a Mac or install Linux. (Linux is much better anyway)
moarsauce123
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0%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
10/4/2014 | 8:06:46 AM
Re: Listen to customers
That is not entirely true. Microsoft did bother to get user input and that input was loud and clear about not wanting Metro (so why is it still in Win10?), wanting the Start menu (why is it ruined by Metro in Win10), hating the charms (yay, those are gone!), and wanting a better file system (Win10 still uses the decades old, DOS restricted NTFS), better hardware support (all but for most recent hardware was cut from Win8/10), a better graphics subsystem (cue the cricket sound), death to the ribbon (why is it still there?), and less change without purpose such as renaming the same thing and placing it somewhere else.

User feedback is there for years, the most popular request right now is to ditch IE (long overdue), but Microsoft is totally ignorant to the collected user requests. How long did it take Microsoft to fix pasting text into the command line? They finally got around to it.

Microsoft would do much better if they built something that users want. They have all the info and the majority of users are asking for just a few things. I doubt that Nutella purged enough egomaniacs from management to right the course.
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