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Windows 10: 5 Unanswered Questions
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RajivS85
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RajivS85,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/1/2015 | 8:57:22 AM
Switching back to windows 7 or reinstalling windows 10 after one year after upgrade?
I know Microsoft really wants us to use windows 10 but the majority of people really do not want it. So I want to ask what if, since they are using force tactics to pressure people, what if someone upgrades just to be on the safe side and then gets the serial code and then goes back to windows 7. We all got enough of lessons with windows 8.1. Will it be possible to do this? Or would it be possible only to upgrade via a windows 7, which would mean if one day after one year your machine has a problem and you need to reinstall then you cannot switch back to windows 10 unless you pay for it. These details need to be known before they take advantage of people.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
10/7/2014 | 2:13:59 PM
Re: Can Windows be more inclined to open source side?
Good point -- the PC is not dead. Mobile devices have gained a lot of popularity and PC sales are down. However, this does not mean that productivity is not required, and apart from the Surface line, I do not see any hybrid mobile device that might be able to provide the same level of productivity that a PC provides. Granted, mobile devices can be a nice complementary force to aid in productivity.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
10/7/2014 | 1:24:59 PM
Re: Can Windows be more inclined to open source side?
I'd have to disagree with your point. Computer OSs vs portable OSs (mobile, tablet, IoTs) are two different creatures. Sure Apple gives away it's computer OS - but it still only commands around 10% of the market. With their market cap and profitability they can easily subsidize the development of the computer OS. However, I think if the shoe were on the other foot, that is, they had 90% of the marketplace for PCs and 10% portable share, you would see much different behavior from Apple on their OS (as well as different criticisms from the tech press at large). For Apple's mobile, they are the only manufacturer that can use iOS on mobile, so they can subsidize the iOS dev costs with the overpriced hardware that Apple, and ONLY Apple, sells.

Sure, many people can replace a PC if all they do is Facebook, email, browse and tweet. However, many users still use their PC for gaming, Media servers, and productivity software, as well as POS systems. For too long and too loudly, we have heard the PC is dead - it's just not true. The development costs for these types of systems are very expensive and you just can't open source that kind of thing. People want an OS that just works, not an open source OS that has to be constantly tweaked by geeks who know what they are doing. Not to mention, consumers and enterprises want a company to provide support, not to browse forums all day to get some response on why their OS is having problems on the network.
Mark532010
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Mark532010,
User Rank: Moderator
10/6/2014 | 2:27:50 PM
Re: Only one question that matters
and a corollary to that question - is it going to be better for the support department. Many of the things that were easy in Windows XP (like managing default profiles and imaging computers) are much more difficult and complex in Windows 7/8 (requiring sysprep just to update the default image - really Microsoft?! a limit of 3 Sysprep's then you have to start over with a new computer and redo all your work - really Microsoft?! no more imaging with SID changing - really Microsoft?!)

Hopefully someone is taking a hard look at the manageability of Windows10 and its menus, built-in virtual machines, app stores and everything else with an eye to making it easier for the IT dept to do what it has to do.

 
Mark532010
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Mark532010,
User Rank: Moderator
10/6/2014 | 2:18:54 PM
Microsoft needs to look at usability
We just got a Windows tablet because people are unhappy with iPad's inability to access domain resources. The tablet is a nightmare to use. With touch, half of the functions work great in the Modern side but then you hit something like adding a domain printer and get dropped into desktop with its tiny tiny plus signs and clickable arrows and checkboxes - almost impossible to use on a tablet with your fingers.

On the flip side, on my desktop with its big screen and mouse, the Modern side is an joke..However I like many of the concepts.

Microsoft really needs to provide a fully functioning environment for both sides. I hope they can do it with 10.
SteveG950
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SteveG950,
User Rank: Strategist
10/5/2014 | 2:48:52 PM
Re: Sounds Encouraging
Well I agree, that is the question.  Companies not listening to users is an epidemic. Apple comes up with some great innovations but they do not respond well or make changes to individual programs based on user feedback.  I have been in the business a long time and users have good ideas, if companies would just listen.  Windows 7 is difficult to install now because disk controllers, network interfaces, and other hardware interfaces have evolved and Microsoft has not updated the Windows 7 install for years because they want to push people to Windows 8. So lets hope Windows 10 or whatever it is called is really worhwhile.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2014 | 1:55:37 PM
Re: Sounds Encouraging
I continue to use Windows 7 and I'm pretty happy.   I'm interested to know how the different windows applications will be available throughout its many platform.  I think if Microsoft works better with their users, they will be able to get really good features into Windows 10.  Reviews about versions higher than windows 7 aren't that good.    

 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2014 | 3:18:37 AM
Microsoft and the Internet of Things
Most of the large tech firms have a roadmap towards the Internet of Things, Microsoft is no different but the company has not publicized about it a great deal. It will be interesting to see Microsoft's approach, if the OS route is taken then maybe Windows finds its way onto devices such as, the raspberry pi.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2014 | 3:06:44 AM
Re: Can Windows be more inclined to open source side?
Good question. I think the OS of the future will have to be open source. Otherwise, devices will end up costing too much for the consumer. Desktops have been around since a long time, but now there are mobile devices, wearable devices and IoT devices, etc., that consumers and businesses are finding valuable. Technology works best with economies of scale.
SteveG950
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SteveG950,
User Rank: Strategist
10/5/2014 | 1:47:57 AM
Sounds Encouraging
I have not been one to say many good things about Microsoft and especially Windows 8. I installed Windows 8, hated Charms and all the hidden nuiances. I then installed a free Start Menu Program and use it like Windows 7.

I have also continued to do Windows 7 installs but the hardware has advanced so far beyond the Window 7 install support that it can be quite challenging.

I have been quite critical of Microsoft's apparent philosophy of we know what is best for you so don't bother me with the negative feedback. Well that did not work for Vista or Windows 8. Windows 8 was a horrible enterprise product and confusing for general consumers.

Now, it appears, with the departure of Steve Balmer, that Microsoft is making changes that will enhance the product. I am encouraged. As they say, the proof is in the pudding but I will be looking forward to the previews for the first time in a long time. The really good news is that I can run the preview in a new Virtual machine on my MAC and leave my Windows 8 virtual machine alone. I still run Windows 7 on my Windows Development system.

 
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