Microsoft Band Wearable: 9 Key Issues - InformationWeek

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Microsoft Band Wearable: 9 Key Issues
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rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2014 | 2:06:06 PM
Re: Hmmmm
I agree there's a bias but I don't think it's necessarily Apple's fault.  Microsoft's history is littered with failures and half-baked products -- both software and hardware.  Do they deserve a break?  Mabye.  However, I think they've earned a bit of skepticism.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2014 | 2:00:47 PM
Re: One to watch (haha, get it?)
I'd like to expand your comment -- Microsoft's history with all hardware products casts a mighty big shadow on anything new.

Forget the failures.  Even when a product attains competitive/volume parity with market leaders or, some would argue, holds a market-leading position like the XBOX 360, Microsoft still finds a way to set the barn on fire with all the horses inside.

This makes me question Microsoft's entire product development approach.  How do they decide what features are required?  How do they test market their products and learn what's right and wrong?  How do they determine a product is ready?  If a product takes flight, are they prepared to offer the next version with compelling upgrades?

I know Satya seems to be preaching and coaching change but has he done enough?  As you said, will customer's trust them?
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2014 | 1:10:20 PM
Re: Less is more?
@Lorna,

Thank you for your comment, and I think you're right, Microsoft and many other tech companies are blurring those lines to the point that the process of transition from your work environment to your home (swithing machines) is very seamless.
Lorna Garey
IW Pick
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
10/31/2014 | 1:07:11 PM
Re: Less is more?
Why does it have to choose between business and consumer? In fact, I'd argue those lines are blurring fast. I think it's a smart strategy to encourage that overlap. Maybe companies purchase these bands as an employee-wellness program. The two are not mutually exclusive.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2014 | 1:04:02 PM
Re: GPS independence, good; battery life, weak; need for accuracy, overblown
@Michael,

Thank you for your reply...I think for many companies that because of the nature of the job (sitting down in front of a screen for 8 hours) it's a huge morale booster.

I'm already imagining schools and other institutions adopting similar programs....very cool!
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
10/31/2014 | 12:48:43 PM
Re: GPS independence, good; battery life, weak; need for accuracy, overblown
Absolutely, for specific portions of the population with specific medial needs (e.g. the elderly, diabetics, etc.), wearble devices offer great potential.

Speaking to your question about business uses, this kind of tech could play a role in corporate wellness programs-- e.g. in which employees are incentivized to exercise via lower health care costs or other benefits.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2014 | 12:48:11 PM
Re: Less is more?
@Michael,

I agreed,

Even though Apple has done an impressive job as squeezign in so much features and functionality into a wrist watch, there's still the question is it'll be something that consumers really use? (I can't picture my self sending a text message from a watch).

So like you mention, Microsoft is definilty doing the right thing at targetting a price range that's more accesible, and could have higher probability of being more widely use.

In fact, if Microsoft allows for the watch to interact with PCs and Laptops (since the user base is wider than windows smartphones), it would be a hit.

Like similar products, the watch would interact with the home PC/Laptop, and be able to capture and process data while at home, exercising, etc.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2014 | 12:44:53 PM
Re: Less is more?
@Lorna,

Here's a question.... is Microsoft aiming this to be part of it's consumor product portoflio? business? or both?

With the surface, Microsoft had some rought leassons learned before going back to it's roots and aiming the new Surface mostly as a laptop replacement than a consumer tablet.

It would be interesting to see how these wearbles cross between devices and environments (consumers vs business)
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
10/31/2014 | 12:42:59 PM
Re: Less is more?
Indeed, Lorna, the licensing piece is quite interesting. I assume Microsoft wants Windows for Wearables to run on third-party devices, just like Google wants OEMs to build Android Wear devices. If Microsoft uses its own first-party devices as a kind of reference design for other manufacturers, it could help the wearables-oriented version of Windows 10 to pick up steam. Microsoft hasn't said much about the OS on the device (SDKS, etc), but I expect we'll hear more soon. Also suggests that after making some OEMs uneasy with its Surface tablets, Microsoft is sensitive to competiting with its own partners.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2014 | 12:42:51 PM
Re: GPS independence, good; battery life, weak; need for accuracy, overblown
@Michael,

To add to your comment... and like you mention, once these types of devices are blessed by the powers that be, we would see a wider level of implementation in the health sector.

I think that care for elderly would be one where many relatives will welcome a more technololgy driven way to monitor patients.

 
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