The IT Talent Shortage Debate - InformationWeek

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The IT Talent Shortage Debate
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Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
11/9/2014 | 9:06:12 PM
Re: There's no skill shortage, there's an ETHICS shortage
Thaddeus, 

You have spoken some good truths in a very straightforward way. I appreciate it very much.

I have seen similar things to the ones you point out. That unwillingness to pay for quality talent is found all over the place. It's been like a virus that has spread all over. 

Some corporations go as far as offering you peanuts when they perfectly know the value of the work and they also know they are offering half, or even less than what the job was worth years ago. Sometimes I don't know how they have the courage to do it and ask if this is acceptable when they know it is not. 

-Susan
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
11/9/2014 | 7:40:26 AM
Re: Purple Squirrel
Indeed, I was granted a job interview a couple of years ago where I had less than half the "requisite" experience posted.

I was not ultimately hired, but I was the finalist who just barely got beaten out.  Many of the people who didn't get hired had well over 20-25 years of experience.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
11/8/2014 | 5:02:50 AM
Re: Poor IT Management, Lazy HR
"In the Bay Area many non-tech jobs are paying around six figures.  Police officer in San Fran, starts at 90k + Pension + (best benefits in the world) + Job Security, education requirement (only a 2-year degree)."

I agree with some of your points, but I think the quoted passage is a bit misleading. With your example, you're talking about government jobs, though, which aren't representative of the "non-tech" jobs in the Bay Area. The statistics are pretty clear that tech workers (and engineers in particular) make way more money relative to people outside tech. I have no problem with tech workers making a lot-- in fact, in some cases, I think many of them should be even better compensated. But I don't think you can point to "non-tech" workers, who generally earn much less, if you're trying to demonstrate how tech employees are getting hosed. 

The median annual salary, including all tech workers, in SF is something like $63k, according to at least one source I've seen. Meanwhile, I've seen several surveys that peg average engineering salaries in the region at 50-100% more than this median. If we go back to that median figure and consider that many, many tech jobs in SF are in the upper 50%, and that many government workers are also in the upper 50%, we'll have to conclude that many, many public sector non-tech workers are in the bottom 50%. Suppose you make $50k in SF. Sounds okay, right, even if it's below the median? It might be a workable amount, if you don't have kids-- but in a city in which renting a new apartment will set you back around $25k annually, that $50k salary (which comes in closer to $35k after taxes) doesn't go very far. If you also consider that many young non-tech workers have huge student loans (just like most young tech workers do), that $50k starts to look really meager. Certainly, it becomes meager enough that you can't use such an employee to demonstrate how a highly-paid engineer is getting screwed. I realize that you said you were talking about people earning six figures-- but my point is, these people are far rarer among non-tech workers than you seem to indicate.

The engineering averages (and other measures of local tech salaries) are often inflated by the presence of a few extreme outliers (e.g. I saw one that included people like Mark Zuckerberg in the "tech employees" category, which has to have had a significant effect on the overall average). But nevertheless, even without job security, tech works in the bay area are better enabled than many "non-tech" workers to accrue wealth, and to have some sort of nest egg if they lose their jobs. I don't mean to belittle that tech workers sometimes get a raw deal-- they do. As some of my other posts demonstrate, I think many complaints about hiring practices and wages in the tech industry are valid. But I don't think the Bay Area's non-tech workers are a good example for the way tech workers are getting screwed, at least not if you paint with a broad brush.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
11/4/2014 | 6:02:43 PM
Re: More survey details?
@Laurianne: Thank you! Wealth of info in that link, appreciate your sharing it and look forward to more on this topic.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/4/2014 | 12:35:08 PM
Re: Purple Squirrel
@B52Junebug, you're right, women can face backlash about ambition in some companies and interview situations. Check out this interesting advice from negotiation expert Joan C. Williams, on how women can employ "gender judo" strategies: http://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/team-building-and-staffing/gender-judo-salary-negotiation-tactics-for-women-/a/d-id/1297532
Laurianne
IW Pick
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/4/2014 | 12:28:01 PM
Re: The age of Digital Screening
Here is a related article with tips on navigating the screening software -- another unpleasant IT job hunt reality that won't change soon: http://www.informationweek.com/software/information-management/it-jobs-how-to-master-applicant-tracking-systems/d/d-id/1316232
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/4/2014 | 11:42:33 AM
Re: Purple Squirrel
That is true Joe, that women and men react to job descriptions differently. Female CIOs tell me they teach their rising stars to apply when they have say 75% of what the descrip asks for -- because the men will roll the dice at this point, and if women don't, they fall behind.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/4/2014 | 11:38:39 AM
Re: Talent's out there for companies that are looking
Thanks, @fullstackdavid. You raise a point I heard from many of the recruiters and HR pros: More and more, the companies who win at the talent game do it through the strength of their IT pros' own networks. Companies really love to hire people who are going to bring a rock star personal network to the party. If you have this, flaunt it. And as you point out, if you're a student or a new IT pro, work your way into those personal networks via hackathons and events. Glad your students are getting good results.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/4/2014 | 11:30:52 AM
Re: The disconnect is between IT leadership and project leadershp
Good point re Agile and the continuous measurement of velocity. Agile doesn't have to mean constant personnel turnover, but it may turn into that if IT leadership and project managers get out of sync.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/4/2014 | 11:25:10 AM
Re: Poor IT Management, Lazy HR
You heard the recruiter in this story tell me that the industry is still fighting the worry among college students that they will train for IT careers only to see jobs move to India. No wonder they worry about it; many of them saw their parents live through it. The reality is H-1B is not going away, like it or not.
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