The IT Talent Shortage Debate - InformationWeek

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The IT Talent Shortage Debate
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williame8191
IW Pick
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williame8191,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2014 | 9:04:42 AM
Misdefined Talent Shortage
As an educator (35 years), I see no talent shortage.  Indeed, technical graduates in Computer Science, Database Analytics, and similar fields (some bachelor's degrees, some master's degrees) cannot find work (except as restuarant servers).  There certainly IS a shortage of these graduates willing to work in IT for $11/hour.
$28018109
50%
50%
$28018109,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2014 | 9:39:02 AM
Poor IT Management, Lazy HR
"IT leaders must staff projects quickly"
Only if they're poor managers who haven't been doing any PLANNING.

"often requiring specialized skills that most job hunters -- especially generalists or those looking to change tech tracks -- don't have."
Only under poor management who haven't been doing any internal TRAINING.

"As a result, hiring organizations see an IT talent shortage"
In my neighborhood there's a shortage of kids who can mow my lawn perfectly in less than 15 minutes. For $10.
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/3/2014 | 10:09:00 AM
Re: Poor IT Management, Lazy HR
Salary of course plays a large role here. Are companies unrealistic? We asked our survey respondents: "What factors other than an IT talent shortage create significant obstacles to hiring at your organization?" About 50% said "Our salaries are too low." That's telling.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
11/3/2014 | 10:32:52 AM
Oddly specific
I've always been puzzled by the over-emphasis on checklists of different tools or even programming languages the ideal candidate is supposed to have experience with. IT is a learning profession, and what companies should prize above all is the ability to adapt to a different tool set or programming language as needed to solve specific business problems.

Harder to make that into a list of bullet points for a job description, I suppose.
PedroGonzales
IW Pick
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
11/3/2014 | 11:06:58 AM
Re: Oddly specific
I agree that the job descriptions seems to be for people with multiple skills and experience.  It seems they are really looking for a purple mouse.  Right now, I have notice it is about who you know?  In order for job candidates to pass the resume filter.  For me, it seems like trying to climb the Great Wall of china. 
Lorna Garey
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50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
11/3/2014 | 12:57:22 PM
Re: Oddly specific
I think companies worry about hiring smart people and spending a chunk of cash on training, only to have that person then jump to a higher-paying job elsewhere. However, I don't think the answer is "don't train," I think it's "Train, then treat and pay people well so they want to stay." It's not all about money.
BobC513
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0%
BobC513,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2014 | 1:02:12 PM
Specialist or generalist?
Seems like the wrong question to me. What happens when the coder with guru Python skills isn't "relevant" anymore because some new hot thing has come along and all the IT herds start chasing THAT?  Suddenly the specialist is on the out. On the other hand, the generalist can't do the very specific tasks that are in the queue.

HR should not be looking for either, They should be looking for candidates that are adaaptable, are quick to learn and have a foundation of good work habits. Companies would do better stop looking at developers, admins, architects - anyone in the IT services stack - as fungible resources to plug in and out of projects as needed. Instead they should be building teams that can work together over the long haul. This grates against the acolytes of The Bottom Line because employees are expenses to be minimized, not assets to utlized at their greatest potential. 
asksqn
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0%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
11/3/2014 | 1:38:32 PM
Seriously?
Industry is whining about a talent shortage - really?  Hello and welcome to 1999.  LOL I guess when you toss away the employment applications of anyone over age 30 and/or rule out the other half of the population that is female, then it can be called a talent "shortage," but the reality is that this has been the mantra of the IT industry since qualified applicants could demand over $10.00/hr. for a job in tech.  Now it's just all about bringing in the cheaper foreign workers on an H1B visa instead of hiring qualified Americans regardless of gender.  
TerryB
100%
0%
TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
11/3/2014 | 2:03:30 PM
Re: Specialist or generalist?
The specialization has gotten out of control in IT. There are so many technologies now and companies seem to want to match up exactly with what you have done. It used to be if you were a programmer, it didn't matter what language because it was assumed you could program in any language, whether you'd ever done it before or not. Now, as @Bob says, a Python programmer can't possibly code in PHP or Ext JS, at least in minds of HR.

That started to change, slowly at first, when Object Oriented Programming came into existence. Some of the old guys like myself from COBOL/RPG on mainframe days just couldn't adjust to that style. When Java use exploded that really came to a head. Now there are dozens of other languages like Java, knowing java doesn't necessarily get you any of those jobs.

Then Touch/mobile exploded on the scene, requiring a completely different paradigm on how you write the UI and programs, regardless of programming language. Now a Java programmer can't get a Java programming job because he never wrote Touch/smartphone apps before.

You can't keep up as an IT person anymore, it is not possible. I just laugh when I see all these self professed experts on security, mobile development and (my favorite) cloud. You're an expert? Really? And exactly how did you become an "expert"? Schools don't have experts teaching in very many places. You didn't read yourself into becoming an expert. The only true experts were just poor saps like ourselves who found themsleves thrust into the bleeding edge of one of these technologies and learned enough to complete a project. But most are hardly "experts", not like they have worked on same technology for 20-30 years like most of old timers used to do.

I have no idea what the fix is for this mindset. What is a new person entering IT supposed to focus on these days? Because chances are extremely high what they learn won't be used 5 years from now.
Susan_Nunziata
50%
50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
11/3/2014 | 2:16:37 PM
More survey details?
@Laurianne: Great post, excellent questions and points raised here. One question. Can you elaborate on this:

InformationWeek asked the IT community: Do you see an IT talent shortage today in one or more technology areas important to your business? Yes, said 73% of respondents at companies with fewer than 1,000 employees, and a whopping 88% of respondents at larger companies.

Was this a flash poll? A survey conducted by Information Week? How many respondents did you receive in each of these company-size categories? was this just in U.S. or worldwide?

 
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