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Facial Analysis: Wall Street's Next Big-Data Tool
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Gigi3
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Gigi3,
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12/8/2014 | 4:40:47 AM
Re: Speech Recognition already used when you call your insurance company
"I wonder if the system could be duped. You could then fake fear to convince facial analysts to sell when they shouldn't."

Thomas, eventhough we are saying face is the mirror of heart/feelings; how many people express it correctly. Most of the top level peoples may have either a smiling face always by hiding the real facts or grievances.  
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
12/8/2014 | 4:37:21 AM
Facial Analysis
"Facial expressions can provide a window into a person's unspoken thoughts. But can these nonverbal tells provide real-time insights for financial traders?

Jeff, is it possible? I won't think it can be hundred percentages accurate. I know (Have witnessed) many CEO's share smart smile to employees while signing the termination letters. Certain peoples wont  show what they have in their inner heart.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
12/8/2014 | 2:26:29 AM
Re: Speech Recognition already used when you call your insurance company
"If the system works correctly" being the key phrase.

Polygraphs can be faked out too (not to mention are notoriously unreliable).  There's no reason to think that a good actor couldn't fool a facial recognition system.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
12/8/2014 | 2:22:43 AM
Re: Speech Recognition already used when you call your insurance company
Or, for that matter, fake optimism.

It reminds me of competitive duplicate bridge.  ACBL rules dictate that all bids and plays must be made smoothly and unexpressively -- not only so that partner not be given unauthorized information, but also so that opponents (for whom, admittedly, such information would not be unauthorized) may not be "faked out."
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
12/6/2014 | 8:54:52 PM
Re: Speech Recognition already used when you call your insurance company
>> I wonder if the system could be duped. You could then fake fear to convince facial analysts to sell when they shouldn't.

 

If the system works correctly, it will set the context correctly so it can detect fakery. 
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
12/5/2014 | 5:07:40 PM
Re: Speech Recognition already used when you call your insurance company
I wonder if the system could be duped. You could then fake fear to convince facial analysts to sell when they shouldn't.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
12/5/2014 | 12:19:47 PM
Facial camouflage
There's been a lot discussion about cameras that can track faces and identify you based on that alone and that's led to some really interesting uses of makeup and fashion to create facial profiles that are impossible to decipher for a computer. 

I wonder if we'll start to see new fashion trends emerge in the future that cater to the people who want to be anonymous. Of course there would need to be a good few of them otherwise it would be a little redundant.

You can't be the only anonymous person. 
MedicalQuack
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MedicalQuack,
User Rank: Moderator
12/4/2014 | 11:55:04 PM
Speech Recognition already used when you call your insurance company
You may or may not be aware of the software now used by most insurance companies but when you say yes to this call may be recorded, it's turning a million algorithms loose to analyize your current state of mind via your voice.  It's supposed to match you up with a representative that's likely to be able to work with you better...it may do that, but more importantly, the analytics score you and then they have data of scored voices to sell to behavioral analytics folks, been going on for a while and is part of the data selling epidemic in the US for profit.

So add on facial recognition for this too?  Yup could be fun and I read the other day about consumer video conversations with your bank so yeah, add this one and now we have video files to add to the voice files that already get sold...it's all about money on the back side.  I think I'll pass on video with my bank:)  Who knows they could also be using the same voice software as well.  Cigna did a whole deal a couple years ago bragging about it.  There's a good video at the link here from Christopher Steiner and he brings up some good points, like when does an algorithm cross the line from being a utility and become a menace...

http://ducknetweb.blogspot.com/2014/05/this-call-may-be-recorded-for-quality.html

Oh and by the way the voice software claims too that it can tell at a rate of about 75% accuracy if you have prostate cancer too...that may be pushing it a bit far but imagine that data being sold too..lol...
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
12/4/2014 | 6:35:09 PM
Wow
Seems like facial recognition could be a scary tool. It raises some privacy questions, although how private are our facial expressions?

I think with a technology like this being used in public places and implemented in interesting ways we are going to find this out soon enough. 


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