Geekend: Pardon Me, Is That A Nose On Your Arm? - InformationWeek

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Geekend: Pardon Me, Is That A Nose On Your Arm?
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Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2015 | 5:33:03 PM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
For the ultimate low cost dental care, I guess, the world has to wait for Nano-bots that live with-in the body 24/7, filling any cavities that develop in the teeth and remove wisdom teeth automatically. But even now, I think it is great that an individual can custom mold a fitting for a chipped tooth.  
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/4/2015 | 11:59:53 AM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
Gary, 

The 3D printed tooth goes screwed to a metal screw that goes into the bone; this is done by a micro-surgery. A woman in the Netherlands got a 3D printed new jaw some years ago. It was the first of its kind. 

-Susan
Gary_EL
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50%
Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2015 | 11:51:03 AM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
Interesting. I did some follow-up, but it seems that even after the teeth are printed, there is still the very expensive process of securing them to the jaw. But just imagine - "printing" teeth!
Susan Fourtané
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50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/4/2015 | 6:38:15 AM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
Gary, 

You can already have 3D printed teeth for implants; they are faster to make and cheaper than traditional ones. I know some dentists are doing this in a dental lab in Germany. 

-Susan 
PedroGonzales
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50%
PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
1/3/2015 | 9:44:49 PM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
I think the biggest area of potential is organ transplant.  If scientist scan figure how to 3D print an organ for a person that their body won't reject, they would have hit the goldmine.  Imagine people who have lost their sight, they could print new cells that could give them their sight back.  The sky is the limit here.
Gary_EL
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50%
Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
1/3/2015 | 3:35:00 PM
Absolutely Amazing!
I was about to make a joke about cloning my teeth so I don't have to come up with megabucks for dental implants when I read about the potential here for helping people who have been the victims of heretofore hopeless spinal injury. This is really amazingly great news.
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