Geekend: Pardon Me, Is That A Nose On Your Arm? - InformationWeek

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Geekend: Pardon Me, Is That A Nose On Your Arm?
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Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/6/2015 | 5:49:01 PM
Re: Into the future
Susan, I would not mind having Nano-bots in my body. However, I would wait for the advanced versions that are capable of giving an end of year update about the major events that took place, in a Osmosis Jones (2001, movie) type fashion, in full HD!
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 6:41:58 AM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
David, 

The German lab is successfully producing 3D printed teeth that are being used in implants in Germany and Estonia. I positively know about these two countries. Most likely the German lab is also working with other dentists in other EU countries, but this is what I know for sure.

I know a dentist in Estonia who works in collaboration with the German lab and she said these 3D printed teeth and good and even better than the traditional ones due to the precision of the system. I met the director of the German lab soem years ago as well. By then, his team had already been working on 3D printed teeth for quite some time, which means by now they are just much better than when they started. 

-Susan 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 6:23:39 AM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
Brian, 

Human organs have already been 3D printed; in a near future these organs will be used for transplants. The only thing that scientists have to perfect is related to the blood vesels. After they can put all the pieces together this is going to be yet another step towards life extension. 

-Susan
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 6:03:53 AM
Into the future
Brian, 

I certainly can't wait for those nanobots to be used for life extension and have some living within me. :D How exciting. I know some people will not like the idea and many others are going to start thinking about the nanoboots being hacked, security, and all that jazz as their first thought. However, this super excites me. Would you have some nanobots embedded within you? 

-Susan    
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/5/2015 | 1:33:47 PM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
@David, I remember watching a documentary in which scientists were creating a human ear in a lab dish. Their major difficulty was to get the cells to create the soft bone structure of the ear -- 3D printing just made that documentary obsolete.

I hope scanning technology is also progressing at an equal pace, because consumers will require a technology that can capture 3D shapes.

I have heard of spectroscopy scanners that have become so small that the device can fit in a user's hand (powered by the cloud in the background), the device can report data down to the molecular level to the user. For instance, if a user scans sugar then, the device will display C12H22O11.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/5/2015 | 9:29:32 AM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
@Brian.Dean- what's intersting about the 3-D printing of organs is that what they print is relatively tiny and then it grows itself beyond that. The printing is mostly the shape and outside structure for the living tissue to grow into. So theoretically, scale shouldn't be an issue though I suspect there are limits to knowing exactly how the mold gets filled.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/5/2015 | 9:26:41 AM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
@Susan- From what I hear (though I can't say anything about the German lab specifically) is that 3-D printed teeth are still not as good as other types of implants. That said, I'm sure it won't be long until they are. There's a lot of experimentation that goes into getting the engineering just right. 
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2015 | 9:59:45 PM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
As the article intimated, the issue that innovators will bump up against is regulation. How close --- or better yet, how far away --- is any FDA approval of 3D-printed bio-material? And once it's approved, it will need to be heavily regulated, right? Otherwise, you'll have people getting nose transplants from butchers on every street corner.
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2015 | 8:45:53 PM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
I think there is huge pontential for 3D printing. It may be a ways off, because it seems like the innovation is going to come from larger companies rather than smaller ones because there is a certain degree of consoidation and cost in that arena. 

But the opportunities are going to be really great in the 3D printing space nonetheless. 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2015 | 5:58:12 PM
Re: Absolutely Amazing!
Susan, it seems that 3D printers are progressing at a very fast pace. I was of the view that 3D printers had a limited range of material with which they could function and did not know that biocompatible materials existed that could be used in a 3D printer.

Another area of limitations that I had in mind was of the scale of the object, but since 3d printers are printing tooth sized objects then, it means that at the small scale these printers are progressing as well.

Combine stem cell research with 3D printers and maybe, the medical tourism industry will be the first to be hit by this new technology. Interesting times!
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