Geekend: Pardon Me, Is That A Nose On Your Arm? - InformationWeek

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Geekend: Pardon Me, Is That A Nose On Your Arm?
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batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
2/3/2015 | 11:15:45 AM
Re: When will regulations catch up?
@kstaron, interesting point as technology do changes rapidly and legal regulation playing catchup... with it...
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
2/3/2015 | 11:14:28 AM
Re: When will regulations catch up?
@Dave interesting point Dave make me think about history old question alive or not soul or soulless...
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/16/2015 | 5:09:32 PM
Re: When will regulations catch up?
A Person? See, now that's an interesting step. Because I'm pretty sure a surgeon right now could take a foot from one person, a hand from another person, a heart from someone else, and catalog all the different body parts and so them all together. I'm pretty sure we wouldn't have a person at the end of that exercise.

There's some sort of "spark of life" at the end of all these parts. I'm not going to call it a soul. I won't even call it a mind. But there's some condition that separates a collection of body parts that's alive from one that is dead. I think there's the trick we're not close to figuring out.
kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
1/16/2015 | 4:17:20 PM
When will regulations catch up?
I remember when they were growing ears on mice, now we can grow our own noses (even if we can't attach them yet). Though I imagine 3D printing won't make the opponents of stem cell research any less nervous. Because if you can make an organ, eventually you can make a whole person and then you have a whole slew of ethical issues to wade through. How long do you think before the regulation catch up to the science so people can get the noses attached in the traditional place?
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
1/12/2015 | 8:20:33 AM
interesting
@Dave, interesting to know... it like asking are we changing technology or technology changing us... we are living in interesting times
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2015 | 6:09:08 AM
Re: Into the future
Brian, 

Fascinating, indeed. It makes sense to me that technology, instead of medicine, is the one that will cure cancer and other conditions. If medicine didn't get a cure by now it probably won't. The nanobots coming to the rescue remind me of the movie Fantastic Journey. A group of scientists in a submarine were minitaturized and injected into the patient's blood stream because only being within the body they could perform a surgery he needed. 

Interesting. Yes, there is still a great pontential in 3D printing.

-Susan
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/6/2015 | 7:46:14 PM
Re: Into the future
Susan, great explanation of a series of events!

I had always assumed that medicine might be the only cure for cancer, but the way technology is progressing it seems that silicon could cure cancer.

Yes, I was referring to 3D printers that are used to printer tattoos. Technology has an overlapping aspect to it. 3D printers might help the creation of advanced precision control catheters that can help doctors to preform heart surgery, etc., until the Nano-bots arrive.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 7:10:58 PM
Re: Into the future
Brian, 

Yes, around 2030 is what they said. Nanobots will help fight cancer and other conditions. If there is a nanobot already ready in your system by the time the first cell with cancer appears and then it's exterminated it's the end of it. 

You mean 3D printed tattoos? 

-Susan
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/6/2015 | 6:56:45 PM
Re: Into the future
Susan, if 2030 is a reasonable time-frame then, it will be interesting to see firsthand the advance of technology in the next 200 years, because Nano-bots should extend life by that amount of time at a minimum.

And speaking of needles, I have seen some great art work that has been applied to the human body using 3D printers. Artists sometime get the final result wrong -- 3D printers are good in this regard as well.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 6:15:28 PM
Re: Into the future
Brian, 

We can have them by around 2030, according to what I have read. I almost got an NFC chip implanted last month at a bio-hacker summit. :D I changed my mind when I saw the needle. 

-Susan
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