10 Signs You've Hired The Wrong Person - InformationWeek

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10 Signs You've Hired The Wrong Person
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Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 2:35:23 PM
Re: Hard to see these issues in interviews
Oh, I am sure that's what the lawyers would say. But ethically, is it the right move?
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 2:25:46 PM
Re: Hard to see these issues in interviews
@Lorna I would guess the lawyers at the company would tell that person that s/he doesn't have to answer that kind of question and can just cite company policy for the refusal.  
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 2:23:03 PM
Re: Hard to see these issues in interviews
Yes, exactly. Often, the hiring HR manager will ask about a former worker, "Would you rehire?" A simple "no" isn't something one could be sued for (at least, I don't think so).
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 2:19:43 PM
Re: Hard to see these issues in interviews
@Lorna Some companies will never give someone a bad reference. They're afraid of being sued for ruining the candidate's career. I've also heard of companies that don't want to be held responsible one way or the other, so they will only confirm if the person worked at the outfit. 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 2:16:55 PM
Hard to see these issues in interviews
People tend to be on their best behavior in interviews, and in today's litigious society, it's tricky to get references (whether official or found through social media/other contacts) to be totally frank about an applicant. Worst case, the references might be desperately hoping someone hires this turkey to get him out of their company.

How much do people use back channels to get the real scoop?
mpochan156
IW Pick
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mpochan156,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 12:23:04 PM
an average hiring process yields average results
What was really distressing was the statement that some companies are "in a hurry." That ensures problems... UNLESS... they design a more efficient Hiring Process. And they will repeat ' we don't have time.' Well... you have time to blow $50,000 on the mistake ? Engage someone else to do it that has experience with IT people. DO NOT expect the average HR department to do it. (not a popular opinion)->  They should be handling the mechanics the hire AFTER they clear the improved process.

We were a rapidly growing business app software company and needed two people a month. Being engineering-minded, we worked the numbers backwards; to get one GREAT hire , we would need to interview 5, review 25 and sift through 50 - 75 if we did an open market ad. 

We re-built our previous Hiring Process ( which was processing 1/4th that number ) and smartly distributed the workload across our teams. We also educated our teams in how to review, interview. We created a new numerical scoring system that focused on the technical skills, people skills and the business acumen, not the usual generic HR stuff. We made each of the final five take an exam ( THAT weeded out several potential 'poor fits' ). The final five was made aware that IF they were hired, they would be on Probation for six months and would have to work out of it. ( that also got rid of a few 'poor fits' ). We also laid out the process in a flowchart and spreadsheet to calculate the time allowed for the hiring tasks for everyone to follow. And we did cast nets in our networks, personal and business.

It worked very well. It can be done. And it will save money and angst and lawsuits. 

Mike

p.s. I love it / cringe when I hear tech startups who just got funded say " we need to hire 140 in the next month." Do they realize how many people they will have to process to get the best ? No. They usually just hire anybody close to the criteria, and then waste time un-hiring them. 
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
1/6/2015 | 11:04:39 AM
Re: Self-sabotage
What's even more disturbing than getting rid of the person is KEEPING him/her. The hiring manager things, hopefully they will fit in, and lose the one or two things that are causing problems. Nobody shows up with all 10 of these problems, usually it's just one or two. Sometimes is does work out, most times no. Sometimes they transfer the person because the company has made a committment to them. It's a strange, strange world.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2015 | 10:40:02 AM
Self-sabotage
Every scenario is unique. There are times when it's the company's fault for misreading a candidate who may be talented but a bad fit. And companies often do a bait and switch on what a job really entails, which can be frustrating for anyone. But if a candidate did well enough in the interview to get the gig, one assumes it's a solid match. This is when self-sabotaging comes into the picture. If your negative traits and poor communication skills get the best of you, you're in trouble. The common thread that runs through this slideshow is that if you're too cynical and not a team player, you're going to have trouble keeping a job.
delphineous
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delphineous,
User Rank: Strategist
1/6/2015 | 10:12:28 AM
Lost premise
The teaser for this article states "Look for these warning signs before you make the hire." - the entire article is after the fact signs; just as it is titled. I'm satisfied with the article and have seen numerous instances exactly as described. It's a shame the teaser editor is so lame!
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