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Geekend: Predicting Your Future By Scanning Your Brain
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David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/16/2015 | 11:34:53 AM
Re: The end of crime?
@li tan- No, not at all. And it doesn't claim to. At best, what it can do is identify the characteristics of the brain that makes certain crimes possible-- like impulse control. The goal of the study was to simply make better parole decisions by seeing what were the characteristics of people who stayed out of jail a second time and who came back. There's a long way to go before being predictive. But the study was already more accurate than some existing methods we use. 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/15/2015 | 1:07:24 PM
Re: The end of crime?
@Susan- While I love the thought of nanobots, I still think the vaccine approach or increased early detection is goign to win out. There's no reason we can't train the immune system to do what we're planning on teaching those nanobots to do. And probably faster. Our immune system is amazingly good at adatping and killing things. 

Also, sending genetic signals to cancer cells to behave like "normal" cells has promise, too. I think we've got a better chance of doing either of those faster than inventing nanobots and teahcing them to kill only cancer cells.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/14/2015 | 10:15:09 PM
Re: The end of crime?
David, 

There were treatments left, but did it mean she had a chance, or was it more something to extend her suffering for a bit longer? That's the true thing to look into. Because, I am again assuming that if she was ready to die is because she was going to die anyway anytime soon, treatments or not treatments. Probably tolerating those treatments had become too much for her. 

I am assuming if she would have had a chance of survival --which is rare in cancer cases-- she would have kept fighting. Extending her suffering is not giving her quality of life. Forcing her to tolerate her condition is even worse, physical and psychologically speaking.  

If you have a link to this case, I would like to read more about it. So far, I am just assuming the reasons why she preferred to die. I would like to know the facts behind it.

A cure for cancer might come in the form of nanobots implanted into the patient, which could destroy the first cancerigenous cells as soon as they appear, not allowing them to expand to vital organs. Medicine doesn't seem to have advanced too much in cancer treatments. 

-Susan  
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/14/2015 | 11:02:22 AM
Re: The end of crime?
There were treatments left. That's the problem. But the horrible thing about cancer drugs is sometimes in the moment they feel worse than the disease. A lot of people suffering from cancer feel better (in the short term) without their medicine. It is just an awful disease and I suspect we can always assume some tragedy around it until we find a a true cure.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/14/2015 | 1:59:44 AM
Re: The end of crime?
David, 

Yes, yes. I see your point. I agree that courts are on a weird position. But I still think they should have respected the teenage girl. I am assuming there were no more treatments for trying, and/or everything was just too much for her. I read another story recently about a child being hit by a car. Is that the same case? 

-Susan
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/14/2015 | 1:42:57 AM
Re: The end of crime?
@Susan- To be honest, I don't know enough of the details to have an opinion. But courts ar ein a weird spot. If a parent doesn't do everything to keep their child alive, they could be shunned or even imprisoned. Imagine if a toddler walked into the street and all a parent did was say, "hey, maybe you should come back here" and the child was hit by a car.

Now imagine a parent tried three cancer drugs and there were three more. 

I don't know. But I think that's the problem courts are under. If a parent still has a shot to save their child, society usually says thay should try.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/14/2015 | 1:28:50 AM
Re: The end of crime?
David, 

The teenager's story is very sad. :( Most likely her pain was intolerable if she was ready to die. I believe the parents had a very selfish attitude thinking more about them losing a daughter than accepting the fact that their daughter couldn't tolerate the condition any longer. They should have respected her. The court also showed no respect toward the girl's will to end a painful and slow death. How sad. It's like if she were not the owner of her own body and wouldn't know what's best for her according to something only she can feel, and had no right whatsoever to decide on her own life.

The same I think about denying treatment to a child that could be saved otherwise.  

"And kids don't have protection in the cases where a parent makes a reasonable decision that goes poorly."

That's terrible. I said earlier that it's not easy to know what is right. I don't know how this is going to sound to you, but I believe in such cases, like the ones you mentioned, it's the child the one who should make the decision if the child has understanding of the situation; like the case of that teenager. 

Another thing is that each case should be taken individually instead of just following what the book says, which can work for some, but not for all. 

-Susan
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
1/14/2015 | 1:05:30 AM
Re: The end of crime?
David, 

I remember the one on drawing and math ability. Yes, I'll put them on my reading list. :) 

-Susan
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/13/2015 | 6:05:23 PM
Re: The end of crime?
@GAProgrammer0 to be fair to the scientists in question, I don't believe any of them are offering tests right now for anyone who wants them. I just suggested that it might be possible in the future. So it may be that all we are doing is learning about the brain and there never will be tests to determine these things. But we have GMO food so I assume one day we'll have GMO babies. Or at least people who want to try to change the babies they've got.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/13/2015 | 6:02:22 PM
Re: The end of crime?
@susan- for the most part, parents can give consent on behalf of kids for scientific research. And kids don't have protection in the cases where a parent makes a reasonable decision that goes poorly. For instance, if a child has a disease and the parent chooses to allow the child to take an experimental medicine to try to save the child's life, the child usually can't over rule the decision.

In fact, recently, a teenage girl asked to be allowed to die because she had cancer. The parents wanted her to fight on and try more potential cures. The girl actually sued her parents to let her die and the court ruled for the parents.

that said, in other cases, parents have denied treatment to a child (usually for religious reasons) and the government has ruled in favor of protecting the child. 

I guess if there is anything to learn from that, usually the government forces you to take your medicine. :)
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