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7 Emerging Technologies IT Should Study Now
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Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
2/23/2015 | 7:13:12 PM
Fog Computing?
Why not move straight to smoke-and-mirrors computing?

We need more technical precision, not Cisco muddying the waters with annoying jargon.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2015 | 10:11:23 PM
Re: Fog Computing?
@Thomas Claburn,

As an old IT manager once told me, that's called 'job security'. Coming from a behemoth like Cisco, I guess it's industry security.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
2/24/2015 | 12:50:37 AM
Re: Fog Computing?
This is an interesting article. I prefer the concept on 3-D displays. This will have a huge value addition for the industries mechanical design, engineering, advertising. It will help people to understand the real feeling of it.
shamika
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shamika,
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2/24/2015 | 12:51:00 AM
Re: Fog Computing?
"Biometric authentication methods" This is a good idea. It will help to have more secure environment. 
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2015 | 8:06:09 AM
Re: Fog Computing?
@shamika,

The risks are less but there's still a huge expenditure. So only the most sensitive of environments will invest in them.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
2/27/2015 | 4:25:35 AM
Re: Fog Computing?
@pcharles09 I agree with you. But it will much easy to use. However as you said there will be huge cost.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
2/28/2015 | 5:03:45 PM
Re: Fog Computing?
@shamika,

Forgot to mention the frustration factor. I worked in a place where certain people needed fingerprint scanners to get work done. I can't tell you the amount of cursing & screaming I heard b/c the scanners either took 3-4 swipes to work or just flat out didn't work at all. I know biometric scanners have improved since then but it's still a possibility.
Aroper-VEC
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Aroper-VEC,
User Rank: Strategist
2/24/2015 | 10:59:47 AM
Re: Fog Computing?
Really? Sounds like a method for adding complexity for complexity's sake. Or, just another marketing term like "cloud" computing.

Still waiting for the "transformational paradigm shifters" to come out.
mak63
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mak63,
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2/24/2015 | 12:47:12 PM
Re: Fog Computing?
"...Sounds like a method for adding complexity for complexity's sake. Or, just another marketing term like "cloud" computing"

Sounds like P2P network to me
Andrew Froehlich
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Andrew Froehlich,
User Rank: Moderator
2/24/2015 | 12:14:32 PM
Re: Fog Computing?
@Thomas - I think that the term Fog Computing is actually a good one. If you understand the concept of cloud computing, fog computing is nothing more than taking the cloud computing concept and pushing it down to the edge where it surrounds us.  Communications and computing will happen closer to the edge device as opposed to inside a data center way up in the clouds.
TerryB
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TerryB,
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2/24/2015 | 1:57:23 PM
Re: Fog Computing?
>>closer to the edge.

You'll have to define that better, Andrew. If it's across a WAN connection, it's in the cloud. If it's inside the WAN connection, it's an on premise VM. Let's cut to the chase here what we are talking about. In the end, it's hardware and software and networking. Why it needs these fancy names to describe where these resources are located is beyond my understanding?
Andrew Froehlich
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Andrew Froehlich,
User Rank: Moderator
2/24/2015 | 2:05:05 PM
Re: Fog Computing?
As mak63 pointed out below, we're also talking about edge-to-edge or P2P communication which adds a whole new complexity to data flows -- and how to secure them. 

It's interesting that the term fog computing rubs people the wrong way. I suppose it's just to close to the term cloud computing? I do remember a bit of a backlash when the "cloud" buzzword came out. But we seemingly have gotten over it and use it regularly as opposed to accessing VM's in a service provider data center or colocation. I wonder if fog computing will be the same?
TerryB
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TerryB,
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2/24/2015 | 2:48:14 PM
Re: Fog Computing?
Well, some of us have gotten over "cloud", not sure that applies to me.  :-) It's all about perspective. I work for Mfg company with shop floor. I give the guys Term Server published desktops on Thin Clients. Trying to convince them "their" desktop doesn't have an issue is always a battle, they can't seem to fathom they are just passing keystrokes and getting screen images. Even funnier is they access the LoB system here (an IBM i5 server) from these server published desktops, which is two hops from the dumb Thin Client hardware. To them, it is all local.

I guess in my context I don't get the P2P stuff. TCP certainly is not a problem in world I live in. But I guess I could see situations that might be preferable. I just still struggling to understand the "edge". To me, that is my router in each plant which talks to WAN and my routers at other plants over point-to-point circuits. If this is all about just converging my router and switches into the same hardware that runs my SAN, virtual routers and virtual switches, I can get my head around that. The less hardware that can fail, the less different o/s you need to support, can only be a good thing. Assuming you avoid the single point of failure trap.

And if this came from Cisco, I'm probably right what this is about. But seeing as how Cisco would cannibalize it's own routers and switches to software in these converged systems, makes me wonder what is motivating them? Or is answer as simple as cloud service, vendors do much better getting lifetime rent than selling you hardware?

Excuse me if I trust all these guys about the same as airline industry. That's worked out so well for all of us consumers.
MWmDenis
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MWmDenis,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/25/2015 | 11:18:48 AM
Re: Fog Computing?
Ah the fog of war - what a wonderful term for adding value to people's lives. Halo computing would be more appropriate. Fog surrounds everything in its environment - it is common around many "things". But many edge things in any specific environment may have different intents / purposes, inputs, connections, controls, optimizations, ... at the edge level without and with need for cloud interaction. IoT Halos are defined as the combination of environment + intent + things + connections + smarts. For instance #SmartHome #SmartHealth #SmartCar #SmartOffice #SmartFactory #SmartPlay. .. Within each you can have sub-halos such as within #SmartHome there is smart-Security, smart-Energy, smart-Entertainment. .. And within some of these there are additional indentured combinations for instance under smart-Energy is smart-heatingandair and smart-lighting
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
2/23/2015 | 7:46:24 PM
Don't we need an edge protocol to do that?
Fog Computing to me sounds a lot like the AllSeen Alliance's AllJoyn protocol, where devices discover each other on a BlueTooth network and discover each other's capabilities.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
2/24/2015 | 9:39:14 AM
Biometrics seems to make the most sense to me...
Still seems like there are a lot of barriers, but man how I would love a world without a bloated password safe...
Aroper-VEC
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Aroper-VEC,
User Rank: Strategist
2/24/2015 | 11:18:26 AM
Re: Biometrics seems to make the most sense to me...
I don't understand why Biometrics gets such a bad rap. When I read about how a certain type of biometric technology gets defeated and then I read the process that it took to defeat the technology, it really makes me wonder. Does this really mean it is so insecure? The amount of effort that has to take place is onerous in a lot of situations and I can't see somebody having that kind of time or access to pull it off outside of a lab environment. For highly secure locations, I can understand having an extremely minimal attack footprint but for the vast majority of us who want to eliminate passwords "good enough" is, well, good enough.

Would I ever rely on biometrics alone? That all depends on what I am trying to secure. Again, it is all about the application. The fingerprint sensor on my iPhone works just fine for unlocking it but I haven't saved my CC information in my phone.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 12:15:19 AM
Re: Biometrics seems to make the most sense to me...
@Aroper: Clouds and Fogs would be a lot secure than it is today. We would have different encryption and different levels of biometrics to bypass and yes even the lowest level biometric takes a lot of time to break because nobody is born with the same fingerprint pattern. Overall we would have a more secure access to the things we want to secure.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
2/24/2015 | 9:54:50 PM
Re: Biometrics seems to make the most sense to me...
@progman 2000.  I agree. I really have a lot problems being able to keep up with huge amounts of passwords I need for all the accounts I have.  If biometrics could be implemented it would really help companies to manage their security much better. Robot collaborating with human is an area I would really interested.  I listen to an article on npr how nurses are become disabled because of problems with their backs due to the heavy lifting.  If robots could support their job it could result on healthier nurses.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 12:11:29 AM
Re: Biometrics seems to make the most sense to me...
@Pedro: Biometrics aren't the best way to go because remember what happened to the fingerprint scanner on the iPhone? It got hacked only 5 days after it was revealed. This shows how poorly we are prepared to fend of an onslaught from hackers.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2015 | 6:17:47 AM
Re: Biometrics seems to make the most sense to me...
That's an early implementation of a fingerprint scanner though.  I think once the mechanics of the biometrics is ironed out it would still end up being vastly more secure than passwords.  Password hacking is one of the biggest vulnerabilites most systems have.  I kind of think there will be a day in the not too distant future when we will remember the 'old' days of using passwords and how medieval it all was (changing every 30 days?  using random sets of characters?  some people still using 'password'?).
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
2/28/2015 | 9:01:32 PM
Re: Biometrics seems to make the most sense to me...
@ SachinEE.  I'm aware of this.  But as an emergent technology is has a huge potential.  It has bugs and flaws. But, imagine one day going to work and using your fingerprint to check to the building, login to the computer, logging to the various websites we need for work without having to create a crazy password every 75 days. It is something I hope we aspire to participate someday.
JimB865
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JimB865,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/24/2015 | 2:38:00 PM
Wireless Fog computing
You gotta love the computer industry.  In alot of cases it's just like block buster movies, they just keep recycling old ideas under new titles.

One of the areas that kind of traverses wireless and fog, is how do you cross the mobile boundary between "apps" and enterprise software applications.

Because at the end of the day, none of the new technology matters if it doesn't bring value added capabilities to the "user" and in the case of most mobile/wireless end point devices, that means software applcations.

Historically enterprise software applications don't run very well of mobile devices and "apps" are limited to entertaining me (angry birds) or lifestyle; personal calendar, organizers, calorie intake, local restaurants.

Technology that's really going to be a game changer, is something that will make enterprise applications as usable as local apps.

Kendo UI and others are taking HTML5 enterrpise software solutions and making them available on mobile devices, but in the guise of a local iOS, Android or Blackberry "app".

The security technology is starting to catch up to the BYOD world, so "device independent" access to any software application, that's actually usable on a mobile device, is getting closer every day.

 

 

 

 

 

 
Nemos
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Nemos,
User Rank: Strategist
2/25/2015 | 6:44:57 PM
Robi
Apart from the first two (that I didn't know to be honest) I don't think all the other is emerging technology, more as "old" can one characterize those.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
2/27/2015 | 7:39:39 AM
Re: 7 Emerging Technologies IT Should Study Now
I'm definitely getting a laugh out of all the hatred for 'fog computing' here in the comments. Now, it's no secret that our industry is bloated with unnecessary buzzwords and impenetrable jargon, but it's often surprising and hilarious which straws break the camels back and which ones we're willing to tolerate. I think I get the idea here; We're talking about environments where access to a traditional cloud would either be unavailable, prohibitively slow, or just not well-suited to the task at hand. This could be someone's home, or also in all kinds of field-operations type environments - think on a boat. Instead, an ad-hoc network is created between local devices to process most of the data and communications between themselves and, if possible, only send what's absolutely necessary back to the/a data center.

This has big implications for IoT and the standards coming up there, Like Charlie is saying, and we had a similar interesting discussion in the comments of Curt Franklin's article about IoT building blocks from the other day, which also ties it back to lots of the other technologies on this list. That data needs to be encrypted in transit without the need for human intervention, especially for, say, a biometrics scanner. The battery life also plays a big role when all the devices are relying on one another to get the job done. All of this can help ease the burden on wireless broadband networks - because, no matter what innovations we come up with, we're talking about a limited amount of spectrum. Robots in the workplace (as described here) are obviously still a little more hypothetical at this point, but there's nothing wrong with having a little fun with a list like this.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
2/28/2015 | 12:11:13 AM
Re: 7 Emerging Technologies IT Should Study Now
@zerox203- I have to say, I hate fog computing, too. But you're right. It is funny how the wording matters to people. If we called it mesh computing or point to point computing would it really change our attitude, or are we just unhappy to have to learn something new?
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
2/28/2015 | 12:14:05 AM
3-D Displays
So in the all the discussion of Fog computing, some of the other interesting technologies are getting lost here. I have a simple quesiton about 3-D displays. How much does the IT department really need to learn about that? Will implementing them be mostly about installing them and just letting them go? What kind of new skill sets will they need?
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
2/28/2015 | 12:15:09 AM
Biometrics
Seems like just a few months ago biometrics were getitng discarded as a not a very useful security measure. If your retina file gets compromised, for instance, you have no replacement. What's changed that we're back on biometrics?


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